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While you can't turn Jupiter into a star, it is not ruled out that you could turn Jupiter into a catastrophic thermonuclear bomb. The limitations to this was calculated at Lawrence Livermore in the 1970s, as a continuation of the work done to check to make sure Earth's oceans wouldn't ignite due to the deuterium content of water. Necessary Conditions for the Initiation and Propagation of Nuclear Detonation Waves in Plane Atmospheres by Weaver and Wood, couldn't rule out a self-sustaining ignition shock-wave in a planetary atmosphere at a deuterium concentration of more than 1 percent at ordinary liquid densities.

Although this makes the oceans safe, Jupiter is big, and it might have segregated a deuterium layer deep inside which has a high enough concentration to allow a self-sustaining nuclear ignition. Then if you drop a configuration of plutonium designed to detonate the deuterium by a nuclear explosion at the appropriate depth, you could get a detonation wave that ignites the entire deuterium layer within a very short time, the time it takes a shock wave to encircle jupiterJupiter.

The energy output could convert a non-negligible fraction of the deuterium in Jupiter to He33He/tritium, and release enormous amount of energy. If 1 Earth mass of deuterium is ignited by the ignition shock wave, the energy release is $10^{38} J$1038 J, over a very short time, perhaps an hour or two and this is already 10,000 times the energy output of the sunSun in a full year. The resulting explosion would destroy that part of the world facing Jupiter, and probably bake the rest. I don't lose sleep over this, though.

If there is a natural trigger for such an explosion, perhaps the collisoncollision of a rocky planet with a gas giant, one might experimentally observe such plantaryplanetary mini-supernovas somewhere. This was suggested in section VIII of Weaver and Wood's paper.

While you can't turn Jupiter into a star, it is not ruled out that you could turn Jupiter into a catastrophic thermonuclear bomb. The limitations to this was calculated at Lawrence Livermore in the 1970s, as a continuation of the work done to check to make sure Earth's oceans wouldn't ignite due to the deuterium content of water. Necessary Conditions for the Initiation and Propagation of Nuclear Detonation Waves in Plane Atmospheres by Weaver and Wood, couldn't rule out a self-sustaining ignition shock-wave in a planetary atmosphere at a deuterium concentration of more than 1 percent at ordinary liquid densities.

Although this makes the oceans safe, Jupiter is big, and it might have segregated a deuterium layer deep inside which has a high enough concentration to allow a self-sustaining nuclear ignition. Then if you drop a configuration of plutonium designed to detonate the deuterium by a nuclear explosion at the appropriate depth, you could get a detonation wave that ignites the entire deuterium layer within a very short time, the time it takes a shock wave to encircle jupiter.

The energy output could convert a non-negligible fraction of the deuterium in Jupiter to He3/tritium, and release enormous amount of energy. If 1 Earth mass of deuterium is ignited by the ignition shock wave, the energy release is $10^{38} J$, over a very short time, perhaps an hour or two and this is already 10,000 times the energy output of the sun in a full year. The resulting explosion would destroy that part of the world facing Jupiter, and probably bake the rest. I don't lose sleep over this, though.

If there is a natural trigger for such an explosion, perhaps the collison of a rocky planet with a gas giant, one might experimentally observe such plantary mini-supernovas somewhere. This was suggested in section VIII of Weaver and Wood's paper.

While you can't turn Jupiter into a star, it is not ruled out that you could turn Jupiter into a catastrophic thermonuclear bomb. The limitations to this was calculated at Lawrence Livermore in the 1970s, as a continuation of the work done to check to make sure Earth's oceans wouldn't ignite due to the deuterium content of water. Necessary Conditions for the Initiation and Propagation of Nuclear Detonation Waves in Plane Atmospheres by Weaver and Wood, couldn't rule out a self-sustaining ignition shock-wave in a planetary atmosphere at a deuterium concentration of more than 1 percent at ordinary liquid densities.

Although this makes the oceans safe, Jupiter is big, and it might have segregated a deuterium layer deep inside which has a high enough concentration to allow a self-sustaining nuclear ignition. Then if you drop a configuration of plutonium designed to detonate the deuterium by a nuclear explosion at the appropriate depth, you could get a detonation wave that ignites the entire deuterium layer within a very short time, the time it takes a shock wave to encircle Jupiter.

The energy output could convert a non-negligible fraction of the deuterium in Jupiter to 3He/tritium, and release enormous amount of energy. If 1 Earth mass of deuterium is ignited by the ignition shock wave, the energy release is 1038 J, over a very short time, perhaps an hour or two and this is already 10,000 times the energy output of the Sun in a full year. The resulting explosion would destroy that part of the world facing Jupiter, and probably bake the rest. I don't lose sleep over this, though.

If there is a natural trigger for such an explosion, perhaps the collision of a rocky planet with a gas giant, one might experimentally observe such planetary mini-supernovas somewhere. This was suggested in section VIII of Weaver and Wood's paper.

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While you can't turn Jupiter into a star, it is not ruled out that you could turn Jupiter into a catastrophic thermonuclear bomb. The limitations to this was calculated at Lawrence Livermore in the 1970s, as a continuation of the work done to check to make sure Earth's oceans wouldn't ignite due to the deuterium content of water. Necessary Conditions for the Initiation and Propagation of Nuclear Detonation Waves in Plane Atmospheres by Weaver and Wood, couldn't rule out a self-sustaining ignition shock-wave in a planetary atmosphere at a deuterium concentration of more than 1 percent at ordinary liquid densities.

Although this makes the oceans safe, Jupiter is big, and it might have segregated a deuterium layer deep inside which has a high enough concentration to allow a self-sustaining nuclear ignition. Then if you drop a configuration of plutonium designed to detonate the deuterium by a nuclear explosion at the appropriate depth, you could get a detonation wave that ignites the entire deuterium layer within a very short time, the time it takes a shock wave to encircle jupiter.

The energy output could convert a non-negligible fraction of the deuterium in Jupiter to He3/tritium, and release enormous amount of energy. If 1 Earth mass of deuterium is ignited by the ignition shock wave, the energy release is $10^{38} J$, over a very short time, perhaps an hour or two and this is already 10,000 times the energy output of the sun in a full year. The resulting explosion would destroy that part of the world facing Jupiter, and probably bake the rest. I don't lose sleep over this, though.

If there is a natural trigger for such an explosion, perhaps the collison of a rocky planet with a gas giant, one might experimentally observe such plantary mini-supernovas somewhere. This was suggested toward the endin section VIII of the mystery Los AlamosWeaver and Wood's paper.

While you can't turn Jupiter into a star, it is not ruled out that you could turn Jupiter into a catastrophic thermonuclear bomb. The limitations to this was calculated at Lawrence Livermore in the 1970s, as a continuation of the work done to check to make sure Earth's oceans wouldn't ignite due to the deuterium content of water. Necessary Conditions for the Initiation and Propagation of Nuclear Detonation Waves in Plane Atmospheres by Weaver and Wood, couldn't rule out a self-sustaining ignition shock-wave in a planetary atmosphere at a deuterium concentration of more than 1 percent at ordinary liquid densities.

Although this makes the oceans safe, Jupiter is big, and it might have segregated a deuterium layer deep inside which has a high enough concentration to allow a self-sustaining nuclear ignition. Then if you drop a configuration of plutonium designed to detonate the deuterium by a nuclear explosion at the appropriate depth, you could get a detonation wave that ignites the entire deuterium layer within a very short time, the time it takes a shock wave to encircle jupiter.

The energy output could convert a non-negligible fraction of the deuterium in Jupiter to He3/tritium, and release enormous amount of energy. If 1 Earth mass of deuterium is ignited by the ignition shock wave, the energy release is $10^{38} J$, over a very short time, perhaps an hour or two and this is already 10,000 times the energy output of the sun in a full year. The resulting explosion would destroy that part of the world facing Jupiter, and probably bake the rest. I don't lose sleep over this, though.

If there is a natural trigger for such an explosion, perhaps the collison of a rocky planet with a gas giant, one might experimentally observe such plantary mini-supernovas somewhere. This was suggested toward the end of the mystery Los Alamos paper.

While you can't turn Jupiter into a star, it is not ruled out that you could turn Jupiter into a catastrophic thermonuclear bomb. The limitations to this was calculated at Lawrence Livermore in the 1970s, as a continuation of the work done to check to make sure Earth's oceans wouldn't ignite due to the deuterium content of water. Necessary Conditions for the Initiation and Propagation of Nuclear Detonation Waves in Plane Atmospheres by Weaver and Wood, couldn't rule out a self-sustaining ignition shock-wave in a planetary atmosphere at a deuterium concentration of more than 1 percent at ordinary liquid densities.

Although this makes the oceans safe, Jupiter is big, and it might have segregated a deuterium layer deep inside which has a high enough concentration to allow a self-sustaining nuclear ignition. Then if you drop a configuration of plutonium designed to detonate the deuterium by a nuclear explosion at the appropriate depth, you could get a detonation wave that ignites the entire deuterium layer within a very short time, the time it takes a shock wave to encircle jupiter.

The energy output could convert a non-negligible fraction of the deuterium in Jupiter to He3/tritium, and release enormous amount of energy. If 1 Earth mass of deuterium is ignited by the ignition shock wave, the energy release is $10^{38} J$, over a very short time, perhaps an hour or two and this is already 10,000 times the energy output of the sun in a full year. The resulting explosion would destroy that part of the world facing Jupiter, and probably bake the rest. I don't lose sleep over this, though.

If there is a natural trigger for such an explosion, perhaps the collison of a rocky planet with a gas giant, one might experimentally observe such plantary mini-supernovas somewhere. This was suggested in section VIII of Weaver and Wood's paper.

2 fix results
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While you can't turn Jupiter into a star, it is not ruled out that you could turn Jupiter into a catastrophic thermonuclear bomb. The limitations to this was calculated at Los AlamosLawrence Livermore in the 1970s, as parta continuation of the checkswork done to check to make sure Earth's oceans wouldn't ignite due to the deuterium content of water,. Necessary Conditions for the Initiation and Propagation of Nuclear Detonation Waves in Plane Atmospheres by Weaver and the result of their analysis is that theyWood, couldn't rule out a self-sustaining ignition shock-wave in a planetary atmosphere at a deuterium concentration of more than about 17%1 percent at ordinary liquid densities (Note: I read this paper through a link here, I thought it was by @mmc, but a review of his comments didn't find the reference, if someone remembers, please say).

Although this makes the oceans safe, Jupiter is big, and Jupiter is cold, and it might have segregated a deuterium layer deep inside which has a high enough concentration to allow a self-sustaining nuclear ignition. Then if you drop a configuration of plutonium designed to detonate the deuterium by a nuclear explosion at the appropriate depth, you could get a detonation wave that ignites the entire deuterium layer within a very short time, the time it takes a shock wave to encircle jupiter.

The energy output could convert a non-negligible fraction of the deuterium in Jupiter to He3/tritium, and release enormous amount of energy. If 1 Earth mass of deuterium is ignited by the ignition shock wave, the energy release is $10^{38} J$, over a very short time, perhaps an hour or two and this is already 10,000 times the energy output of the sun in a full year. The resulting explosion would destroy that part of the world facing Jupiter, and probably bake the rest. I don't lose sleep over this, though.

If there is a natural trigger for such an explosion, perhaps the collison of a rocky planet with a gas giant, one might experimentally observe such plantary mini-supernovas somewhere. This was suggested toward the end of the mystery Los Alamos paper.

While you can't turn Jupiter into a star, it is not ruled out that you could turn Jupiter into a catastrophic thermonuclear bomb. The limitations to this was calculated at Los Alamos, as part of the checks to make sure Earth's oceans wouldn't ignite due to the deuterium content of water, and the result of their analysis is that they couldn't rule out a self-sustaining ignition shock-wave at a deuterium concentration of more than about 17% at ordinary liquid densities (Note: I read this paper through a link here, I thought it was by @mmc, but a review of his comments didn't find the reference, if someone remembers, please say).

Although this makes the oceans safe, Jupiter is big, and Jupiter is cold, and it might have segregated a deuterium layer deep inside which has a high enough concentration to allow a self-sustaining nuclear ignition. Then if you drop a configuration of plutonium designed to detonate the deuterium by a nuclear explosion at the appropriate depth, you could get a detonation wave that ignites the entire deuterium layer within a very short time, the time it takes a shock wave to encircle jupiter.

The energy output could convert a non-negligible fraction of the deuterium in Jupiter to He3/tritium, and release enormous amount of energy. If 1 Earth mass of deuterium is ignited by the ignition shock wave, the energy release is $10^{38} J$, over a very short time, perhaps an hour or two and this is already 10,000 times the energy output of the sun in a full year. The resulting explosion would destroy that part of the world facing Jupiter, and probably bake the rest. I don't lose sleep over this, though.

If there is a natural trigger for such an explosion, perhaps the collison of a rocky planet with a gas giant, one might experimentally observe such plantary mini-supernovas somewhere. This was suggested toward the end of the mystery Los Alamos paper.

While you can't turn Jupiter into a star, it is not ruled out that you could turn Jupiter into a catastrophic thermonuclear bomb. The limitations to this was calculated at Lawrence Livermore in the 1970s, as a continuation of the work done to check to make sure Earth's oceans wouldn't ignite due to the deuterium content of water. Necessary Conditions for the Initiation and Propagation of Nuclear Detonation Waves in Plane Atmospheres by Weaver and Wood, couldn't rule out a self-sustaining ignition shock-wave in a planetary atmosphere at a deuterium concentration of more than 1 percent at ordinary liquid densities.

Although this makes the oceans safe, Jupiter is big, and it might have segregated a deuterium layer deep inside which has a high enough concentration to allow a self-sustaining nuclear ignition. Then if you drop a configuration of plutonium designed to detonate the deuterium by a nuclear explosion at the appropriate depth, you could get a detonation wave that ignites the entire deuterium layer within a very short time, the time it takes a shock wave to encircle jupiter.

The energy output could convert a non-negligible fraction of the deuterium in Jupiter to He3/tritium, and release enormous amount of energy. If 1 Earth mass of deuterium is ignited by the ignition shock wave, the energy release is $10^{38} J$, over a very short time, perhaps an hour or two and this is already 10,000 times the energy output of the sun in a full year. The resulting explosion would destroy that part of the world facing Jupiter, and probably bake the rest. I don't lose sleep over this, though.

If there is a natural trigger for such an explosion, perhaps the collison of a rocky planet with a gas giant, one might experimentally observe such plantary mini-supernovas somewhere. This was suggested toward the end of the mystery Los Alamos paper.

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