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Light is bent near a mass (for example when passing close to the sun as demonstrated in the famous sun eclipse of 1919). I interpret this as an effect of gravity on the light.

However, it seems (to me, at least) that light is not accelerated when it travels directly toward the (bary-)center of the sun. The same gravitational force applies yet the speed of light remains constant (viz. c$c$).

What am I missing?

Light is bent near a mass (for example when passing close to the sun as demonstrated in the famous sun eclipse of 1919). I interpret this as an effect of gravity on the light.

However, it seems (to me, at least) that light is not accelerated when it travels directly toward the (bary-)center of the sun. The same gravitational force applies yet the speed of light remains constant (viz. c).

What am I missing?

Light is bent near a mass (for example when passing close to the sun as demonstrated in the famous sun eclipse of 1919). I interpret this as an effect of gravity on the light.

However, it seems (to me, at least) that light is not accelerated when it travels directly toward the (bary-)center of the sun. The same gravitational force applies yet the speed of light remains constant (viz. $c$).

What am I missing?

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Why is light bent but not accelerated?

Light is bent near a mass (for example when passing close to the sun as demonstrated in the famous sun eclipse of 1919). I interpret this as an effect of gravity on the light.

However, it seems (to me, at least) that light is not accelerated when it travels directly toward the (bary-)center of the sun. The same gravitational force applies yet the speed of light remains constant (viz. c).

What am I missing?