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Why was Carboncarbon-12 chosen for the atomic mass unit?

The atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12th the mass of a Carboncarbon-12 atom. Was there any physical reason for such a definition? Were they trying to include electrons in the atomic mass unit?

Why not define the amu as the mass of one proton or neutron so that in nuclear calculations at least one of the nuclear particles (out of protons and neutrons) would be a nice whole number.?

Why was Carbon-12 chosen for the atomic mass unit?

The atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12th the mass of a Carbon-12 atom. Was there any physical reason for such a definition? Were they trying to include electrons in the atomic mass unit?

Why not define the amu as the mass of one proton or neutron so that in nuclear calculations at least one of the nuclear particles (out of protons and neutrons) would be a nice whole number.

Why was carbon-12 chosen for the atomic mass unit?

The atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12th the mass of a carbon-12 atom. Was there any physical reason for such a definition? Were they trying to include electrons in the atomic mass unit?

Why not define the amu as the mass of one proton or neutron so that in nuclear calculations at least one of the nuclear particles (out of protons and neutrons) would be a nice whole number?

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The atomic mass unitatomic mass unit is defined as 1/12th the mass of a Carbon-12 atom. Was there any physical reason for such a definition? Were they trying to include electrons in the atomic mass unit?

Why not define the amu as the mass of one proton or neutron so that in nuclear calculations at least one of the nuclear particles (out of protons and neutrons) would be a nice whole number.

The atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12th the mass of a Carbon-12 atom. Was there any physical reason for such a definition? Were they trying to include electrons in the atomic mass unit?

Why not define the amu as the mass of one proton or neutron so that in nuclear calculations at least one of the nuclear particles (out of protons and neutrons) would be a nice whole number.

The atomic mass unit is defined as 1/12th the mass of a Carbon-12 atom. Was there any physical reason for such a definition? Were they trying to include electrons in the atomic mass unit?

Why not define the amu as the mass of one proton or neutron so that in nuclear calculations at least one of the nuclear particles (out of protons and neutrons) would be a nice whole number.

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