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The $\Delta^+$ particle has the same quark content as the proton has ($uud$), but nevertheless, its mass is 1232 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$. The mass difference between this particle and the proton is about 575 times the mass of the electron. This surely shows that something is going on between the constituent quarks (the $u$-quark has a "bare" mass of about 4,2 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$, while the $d$-quark has a "bare" mass of about 7,5 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$, which of course doesn't mean quarks can realyreally exist without clothes) which imparts a great deal of mass to both the proton and the $\Delta ^+$ particle.

It's remarkable that the $\Delta ^+$ decays in about $0,6$x$10^{-23}$(sec) into a neutron and positive pion. This short time is a sign that the "something" that's going between the constituent quarks is the strong color force playing around to cause the transition. The lifetime of the proton, on the other hand, is infinite; there isn't a lower energy state it can change into (at [at least in the standard model; in the rishon model, a theory which saysconjectures that quarks and leptons are composite structures, the change from a proton to positron and a meson, usually the neutral pion, is for example easily explained, just as is the mass difference between an electron and a muon, the last of which can be seen in rishon light as an excited state of the electron; butand regarding the distribution of matter and anti-matter, the rishon model solves this conundrum by claiming that there is as much matter as anti-matter! But this is not the place to discuss this model (theory) and I just mention it here as an aside)aside].

The $\Delta^+$ particle has the same quark content as the proton has ($uud$), but nevertheless, its mass is 1232 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$. The mass difference between this particle and the proton is about 575 times the mass of the electron. This surely shows that something is going on between the constituent quarks (the $u$-quark has a "bare" mass of about 4,2 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$, while the $d$-quark has a "bare" mass of about 7,5 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$, which of course doesn't mean quarks can realy exist without clothes) which imparts a great deal of mass to both the proton and the $\Delta ^+$ particle.

It's remarkable that the $\Delta ^+$ decays in about $0,6$x$10^{-23}$(sec) into a neutron and positive pion. This short time is a sign that the "something" that's going between the constituent quarks is the strong color force playing around to cause the transition. The lifetime of the proton, on the other hand, is infinite; there isn't a lower energy state it can change into (at least in the standard model; in the rishon model, a theory which says quarks and leptons are composite, the change from a proton to positron and a meson, usually the neutral pion, is for example easily explained, just as is the mass difference between an electron and a muon, the last of which can be seen in rishon light as an excited state of the electron; but this is not the place to discuss this and I just mention it here as an aside).

The $\Delta^+$ particle has the same quark content as the proton has ($uud$), but nevertheless, its mass is 1232 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$. The mass difference between this particle and the proton is about 575 times the mass of the electron. This surely shows that something is going on between the constituent quarks (the $u$-quark has a "bare" mass of about 4,2 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$, while the $d$-quark has a "bare" mass of about 7,5 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$, which of course doesn't mean quarks can really exist without clothes) which imparts a great deal of mass to both the proton and the $\Delta ^+$ particle.

It's remarkable that the $\Delta ^+$ decays in about $0,6$x$10^{-23}$(sec) into a neutron and positive pion. This short time is a sign that the "something" that's going between the constituent quarks is the strong color force playing around to cause the transition. The lifetime of the proton, on the other hand, is infinite; there isn't a lower energy state it can change into [at least in the standard model; in the rishon model, which conjectures that quarks and leptons are composite structures, the change from a proton to positron and a pion, is for example easily explained, just as is the mass difference between an electron and a muon, the last of which can be seen in rishon light as an excited state of the electron; and regarding the distribution of matter and anti-matter, the rishon model solves this conundrum by claiming that there is as much matter as anti-matter! But this is not the place to discuss this model (theory) and I just mention it here as an aside].

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The $\Delta^+$ particle has the same quark content as the proton has ($uud$), but nevertheless, its mass is 1232 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$. The mass difference between this particle and the proton is about 575 times the mass of the electron. This surely shows that something is going on between the constituent quarks (the $u$-quark has a "bare" mass of about 4,2 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$, while the $d$-quark has a "bare" mass of about 7,5 $\frac{MeV}{c^2}$, which of course doesn't mean quarks can realy exist without clothes) which imparts a great deal of mass to both the proton and the $\Delta ^+$ particle.

It's remarkable that the $\Delta ^+$ decays in about $0,6$x$10^{-23}$(sec) into a neutron and positive pion. This short time is a sign that the "something" that's going between the constituent quarks is the strong color force playing around to cause the transition. The lifetime of the proton, on the other hand, is infinite; there isn't a lower energy state it can change into (at least in the standard model; in the rishon model, a theory which says quarks and leptons are composite, the change from a proton to positron and a meson, usually the neutral pion, is for example easily explained, just as is the mass difference between an electron and a muon, the last of which can be seen in rishon light as an excited state of the electron; but this is not the place to discuss this and I just mention it here as an aside).