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Is simultaneity of arriving at detectors a requirement for a Bell measurement?

No, it's not required. For example, here is a circuit that does a Bell measurement one input at a time:

Time-separated bell measurements

However, note that this circuit has to hold two qubits coherent in the time between A and B's interactions. That's hard to do, so it may be experimentally convenient to have the interactions happening at the same time.

all observers will agree a bell state will be produced by the Bell measurement on two uncorrelated particles?

I'm not sure I get what you're asking. Of course a Bell measurement produces a Bell pair, and how fast you are moving won't affect that.

how to reconcile between the results of LOCC and bell measurement. Will the two photons became entangled in this setup?

In order to perform a teleportation, or a non-local / spatially-separated Bell measurement, you need a Bell pair. One bit of entanglement goes in, you use it to do asomething fancy, and the original entanglement has been burned up.

But actually, because you used it to do a Bell measurement, andyou also had one bit of entanglement comescome out.

You're not So I wouldn't say you're destroying the bit of entanglement, or creating a new bit of entanglement, I'd say you're just remixing the 1 bit of entanglement you already haveinto a different form. Nothing gained, nothing lost, everything consistent.

Also(Also note that quantum teleportation and non-local Bell measurements have a classical communication step. So if A and B are galaxies apart, it's going to take a long time to finish remixing that bit of entanglement.)

Is simultaneity of arriving at detectors a requirement for a Bell measurement?

No, it's not required. For example, here is a circuit that does a Bell measurement one input at a time:

Time-separated bell measurements

However, note that this circuit has to hold two qubits coherent in the time between A and B's interactions. That's hard to do, so it may be experimentally convenient to have the interactions happening at the same time.

all observers will agree a bell state will be produced by the Bell measurement on two uncorrelated particles?

I'm not sure I get what you're asking. Of course a Bell measurement produces a Bell pair, and how fast you are moving won't affect that.

how to reconcile between the results of LOCC and bell measurement. Will the two photons became entangled in this setup?

In order to perform a teleportation, or a non-local / spatially-separated Bell measurement, you need a Bell pair. One bit of entanglement goes in, you use it to do a fancy Bell measurement, and one bit of entanglement comes out.

You're not creating entanglement, you're just remixing the entanglement you already have.

Also note that quantum teleportation and non-local Bell measurements have a classical communication step. So if A and B are galaxies apart, it's going to take a long time to finish remixing that bit of entanglement.

Is simultaneity of arriving at detectors a requirement for a Bell measurement?

No, it's not required. For example, here is a circuit that does a Bell measurement one input at a time:

Time-separated bell measurements

However, note that this circuit has to hold two qubits coherent in the time between A and B's interactions. That's hard to do, so it may be experimentally convenient to have the interactions happening at the same time.

all observers will agree a bell state will be produced by the Bell measurement on two uncorrelated particles?

I'm not sure I get what you're asking. Of course a Bell measurement produces a Bell pair, and how fast you are moving won't affect that.

how to reconcile between the results of LOCC and bell measurement. Will the two photons became entangled in this setup?

In order to perform a teleportation, or a non-local / spatially-separated Bell measurement, you need a Bell pair. One bit of entanglement goes in, you use it to do something fancy, and the original entanglement has been burned up.

But actually, because you used it to do a Bell measurement, you also had one bit of entanglement come out. So I wouldn't say you're destroying the bit of entanglement, or creating a new bit of entanglement, I'd say you're remixing the 1 bit of entanglement into a different form. Nothing gained, nothing lost, everything consistent.

(Also note that quantum teleportation and non-local Bell measurements have a classical communication step. So if A and B are galaxies apart, it's going to take a long time to finish remixing that bit of entanglement.)

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Is simultaneity of arriving at detectors a requirement for a Bell measurement?

No, it's not required. For example, here is a circuit that does a Bell measurement one input at a time:

Time-separated bell measurements

However, note that this circuit has to hold two qubits coherent in the time between A and B's interactions. That's hard to do, so it may be experimentally convenient to have the interactions happening at the same time.

all observers will agree a bell state will be produced by the Bell measurement on two uncorrelated particles?

I'm not sure I get what you're asking. Of course a Bell measurement produces a Bell pair, and how fast you are moving won't affect that.

how to reconcile between the results of LOCC and bell measurement. Will the two photons became entangled in this setup?

In order to perform a teleportation, or a non-local / spatially-separated Bell measurement, you need a Bell pair. 1One bit of entanglement goes in, you use it to do a fancy Bell measurement, and 1one bit of entanglement comes out.

You're not creating entanglement, you're just remixing the entanglement you already have.

Also note that quantum teleportation and non-local Bell measurements have a classical communication step. So if A and B are galaxies apart, it's going to take a long time to finish remixing that bit of entanglement.

Is simultaneity of arriving at detectors a requirement for a Bell measurement?

No, it's not required. For example, here is a circuit that does a Bell measurement one input at a time:

Time-separated bell measurements

However, note that this circuit has to hold two qubits coherent in the time between A and B's interactions. That's hard to do, so it may be experimentally convenient to have the interactions happening at the same time.

all observers will agree a bell state will be produced by the Bell measurement on two uncorrelated particles?

I'm not sure I get what you're asking. Of course a Bell measurement produces a Bell pair, and how fast you are moving won't affect that.

how to reconcile between the results of LOCC and bell measurement. Will the two photons became entangled in this setup?

In order to perform a teleportation, or a non-local / spatially-separated Bell measurement, you need a Bell pair. 1 bit of entanglement goes in, you use it to do a fancy Bell measurement, and 1 bit of entanglement comes out.

You're not creating entanglement, you're just remixing the entanglement you already have.

Is simultaneity of arriving at detectors a requirement for a Bell measurement?

No, it's not required. For example, here is a circuit that does a Bell measurement one input at a time:

Time-separated bell measurements

However, note that this circuit has to hold two qubits coherent in the time between A and B's interactions. That's hard to do, so it may be experimentally convenient to have the interactions happening at the same time.

all observers will agree a bell state will be produced by the Bell measurement on two uncorrelated particles?

I'm not sure I get what you're asking. Of course a Bell measurement produces a Bell pair, and how fast you are moving won't affect that.

how to reconcile between the results of LOCC and bell measurement. Will the two photons became entangled in this setup?

In order to perform a teleportation, or a non-local / spatially-separated Bell measurement, you need a Bell pair. One bit of entanglement goes in, you use it to do a fancy Bell measurement, and one bit of entanglement comes out.

You're not creating entanglement, you're just remixing the entanglement you already have.

Also note that quantum teleportation and non-local Bell measurements have a classical communication step. So if A and B are galaxies apart, it's going to take a long time to finish remixing that bit of entanglement.

1
source | link

Is simultaneity of arriving at detectors a requirement for a Bell measurement?

No, it's not required. For example, here is a circuit that does a Bell measurement one input at a time:

Time-separated bell measurements

However, note that this circuit has to hold two qubits coherent in the time between A and B's interactions. That's hard to do, so it may be experimentally convenient to have the interactions happening at the same time.

all observers will agree a bell state will be produced by the Bell measurement on two uncorrelated particles?

I'm not sure I get what you're asking. Of course a Bell measurement produces a Bell pair, and how fast you are moving won't affect that.

how to reconcile between the results of LOCC and bell measurement. Will the two photons became entangled in this setup?

In order to perform a teleportation, or a non-local / spatially-separated Bell measurement, you need a Bell pair. 1 bit of entanglement goes in, you use it to do a fancy Bell measurement, and 1 bit of entanglement comes out.

You're not creating entanglement, you're just remixing the entanglement you already have.