Tweeted twitter.com/StackPhysics/status/791014384948670465
    Question Protected by Qmechanic
5 deleted 86 characters in body
source | link

What does the Pauli Exclusion Principle mean if time and space are continuous?

Assuming time and space are continuous, identical quantum states would beseem impossible even without the principle. I guess saying something like: the closer the states are the less likely they are to exist, would make sense, but the principle is not usually worded that way, it's usually something along the lines of: two identical fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state, which is just a general property of any type of continua, why even mention that?

What does the Pauli Exclusion Principle mean if time and space are continuous?

Assuming time and space are continuous, identical quantum states would be impossible even without the principle. I guess saying something like: the closer the states are the less likely they are to exist, would make sense, but the principle is not usually worded that way, it's usually something along the lines of: two identical fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state, which is just a general property of any type of continua, why even mention that?

What does the Pauli Exclusion Principle mean if time and space are continuous?

Assuming time and space are continuous, identical quantum states seem impossible even without the principle. I guess saying something like: the closer the states are the less likely they are to exist, would make sense, but the principle is not usually worded that way, it's usually something along the lines of: two identical fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state

4 added 25 characters in body
source | link

What does the Pauli Exclusion Principle mean if time and space are continuous?

IfAssuming time and space are continuous then, identical quantum states arewould be impossible to begin witheven without the principle. I guess saying something like: the closer the states are the less likely they are to exist, would make sense, but the principle is not usually worded that way, it's usually something along the lines of: two identical fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state, which is just a general property of any type of continua, why even saymention that?

What does the Pauli Exclusion Principle mean if time and space are continuous?

If time and space are continuous then identical quantum states are impossible to begin with. I guess saying something like: the closer the states are the less likely they are to exist, would make sense but the principle is not usually worded that way, it's usually something along the lines of: two identical fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state, which is just a general property of any type of continua, why even say that?

What does the Pauli Exclusion Principle mean if time and space are continuous?

Assuming time and space are continuous, identical quantum states would be impossible even without the principle. I guess saying something like: the closer the states are the less likely they are to exist, would make sense, but the principle is not usually worded that way, it's usually something along the lines of: two identical fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state, which is just a general property of any type of continua, why even mention that?

3 clarification
source | link

What does the Pauli Exclusion Principle mean if time and space are continuous?

If time and space are continuous then identical quantum states are impossible to begin with. I I guess saying something like: the closer the states are the less likely they are to exist, would make sense but the principle is not usually worded that way, it's usually something along the lines of: two identical fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state, which makes things confusing.is just a general property of any type of continua, why even say that?

What does the Pauli Exclusion Principle mean if time and space are continuous?

If time and space are continuous then identical quantum states are impossible. I guess saying something like: the closer the states are the less likely they are to exist, would make sense but the principle is not usually worded that way, which makes things confusing.

What does the Pauli Exclusion Principle mean if time and space are continuous?

If time and space are continuous then identical quantum states are impossible to begin with. I guess saying something like: the closer the states are the less likely they are to exist, would make sense but the principle is not usually worded that way, it's usually something along the lines of: two identical fermions cannot occupy the same quantum state, which is just a general property of any type of continua, why even say that?

2 deleted 8 characters in body; edited title
source | link
1
source | link