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Why do you think that liquids have less kinetic energy compared to gasses?

Equipartition theorem (Equipartition theoremhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equipartition_theorem) states that average kinetic energy is the same per degree of freedom and is $kT/2$1/2 * k * T. The motion of a molecule of water inside a liquid is jittery, but still the molecule has 6 degrees of freedom so the kinetic energy should be the same.

This may look counter-intuitive. We heat water, water evaporates, energy consumed $\rightarrow$=> molecules in gas should move faster. Isn't it? Actually the energy goes to breaking the attractive forces between molecules in liquid.

Why do you think that liquids have less kinetic energy compared to gasses?

Equipartition theorem states that average kinetic energy is the same per degree of freedom and is $kT/2$. The motion of a molecule of water inside a liquid is jittery, but still the molecule has 6 degrees of freedom so the kinetic energy should be the same.

This may look counter-intuitive. We heat water, water evaporates, energy consumed $\rightarrow$ molecules in gas should move faster. Isn't it? Actually the energy goes to breaking the attractive forces between molecules in liquid.

Why do you think that liquids have less kinetic energy compared to gasses?

Equipartition theorem (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equipartition_theorem) states that average kinetic energy is the same per degree of freedom and is 1/2 * k * T. The motion of a molecule of water inside a liquid is jittery, but still the molecule has 6 degrees of freedom so the kinetic energy should be the same.

This may look counter-intuitive. We heat water, water evaporates, energy consumed => molecules in gas should move faster. Isn't it? Actually the energy goes to breaking the attractive forces between molecules in liquid.

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source | link

Why do you think that liquids have less kinetic energy compared to gasses?

Equipartition theorem (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equipartition_theoremEquipartition theorem) states that average kinetic energy is the same per degree of freedom and is 1/2 * k * T$kT/2$. The motion of a molecule of water inside a liquid is jittery, but still the molecule has 6 degrees of freedom so the kinetic energy should be the same.

This may look counter-intuitive. We heat water, water evaporates, energy consumed =>$\rightarrow$ molecules in gas should move faster. Isn't it? Actually the energy goes to breaking the attractive forces between molecules in liquid.

Why do you think that liquids have less kinetic energy compared to gasses?

Equipartition theorem (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equipartition_theorem) states that average kinetic energy is the same per degree of freedom and is 1/2 * k * T. The motion of a molecule of water inside a liquid is jittery, but still the molecule has 6 degrees of freedom so the kinetic energy should be the same.

This may look counter-intuitive. We heat water, water evaporates, energy consumed => molecules in gas should move faster. Isn't it? Actually the energy goes to breaking the attractive forces between molecules in liquid.

Why do you think that liquids have less kinetic energy compared to gasses?

Equipartition theorem states that average kinetic energy is the same per degree of freedom and is $kT/2$. The motion of a molecule of water inside a liquid is jittery, but still the molecule has 6 degrees of freedom so the kinetic energy should be the same.

This may look counter-intuitive. We heat water, water evaporates, energy consumed $\rightarrow$ molecules in gas should move faster. Isn't it? Actually the energy goes to breaking the attractive forces between molecules in liquid.

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source | link

Why do you think that liquids have less kinetic energy compared to gasses?

Equipartition theorem (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equipartition_theorem) states that average kinetic energy is the same per degree of freedom and is 1/2 * k * T. The motion of a molecule of water inside a liquid is jittery, but still the molecule has 6 degrees of freedom so the kinetic energy should be the same.

This may look counter-intuitive. We heat water, water evaporates, energy consumed => molecules in gas should move faster. Isn't it? Actually the energy goes to breaking the attractive forces between molecules in liquid.

Why do you think that liquids have less kinetic energy compared to gasses?

Equipartition theorem (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equipartition_theorem) states that average kinetic energy is the same per degree of freedom and is 1/2 * k * T. The motion of a molecule of water inside a liquid is jittery, but still the molecule has 6 degrees of freedom so the kinetic energy should be the same.

This may look counter-intuitive. We heat water, water evaporates, energy consumed => molecules should move faster. Isn't it? Actually the energy goes to breaking the attractive forces between molecules in liquid.

Why do you think that liquids have less kinetic energy compared to gasses?

Equipartition theorem (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equipartition_theorem) states that average kinetic energy is the same per degree of freedom and is 1/2 * k * T. The motion of a molecule of water inside a liquid is jittery, but still the molecule has 6 degrees of freedom so the kinetic energy should be the same.

This may look counter-intuitive. We heat water, water evaporates, energy consumed => molecules in gas should move faster. Isn't it? Actually the energy goes to breaking the attractive forces between molecules in liquid.

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