3 replaced http://physics.stackexchange.com/ with https://physics.stackexchange.com/
source | link

This thought was inspired by a comment from the current leading answer, by @Sentrythe current leading answer, by @Sentry, to the question Where are all the slow neutrinos?Where are all the slow neutrinos?

This [slow-neutrino induced nuclear decay] will still be an extremely rare process and the big problem is to distinguish it from normal spontaneous nuclear decay.

Questions which would need to be addressed as corollaries to the main question, I believe, include:

  • Is such a possibility self-consistent as a theory?

  • How does the required energy density of slow neutrinos compare to the postulated energy density of dark matter?

This thought was inspired by a comment from the current leading answer, by @Sentry, to the question Where are all the slow neutrinos?

This [slow-neutrino induced nuclear decay] will still be an extremely rare process and the big problem is to distinguish it from normal spontaneous nuclear decay.

Questions which would need to be addressed as corollaries to the main question, I believe, include:

  • Is such a possibility self-consistent as a theory?

  • How does the required energy density of slow neutrinos compare to the postulated energy density of dark matter?

This thought was inspired by a comment from the current leading answer, by @Sentry, to the question Where are all the slow neutrinos?

This [slow-neutrino induced nuclear decay] will still be an extremely rare process and the big problem is to distinguish it from normal spontaneous nuclear decay.

Questions which would need to be addressed as corollaries to the main question, I believe, include:

  • Is such a possibility self-consistent as a theory?

  • How does the required energy density of slow neutrinos compare to the postulated energy density of dark matter?

2 fixed broken link
source | link

This thought was inspired by a comment from the current leading answer, by @Sentrythe current leading answer, by @Sentry, to the question Where are all the slow neutrinos?

This [slow-neutrino induced nuclear decay] will still be an extremely rare process and the big problem is to distinguish it from normal spontaneous nuclear decay.

Questions which would need to be addressed as corollaries to the main question, I believe, include:

  • Is such a possibility self-consistent as a theory?

  • How does the required energy density of slow neutrinos compare to the postulated energy density of dark matter?

This thought was inspired by a comment from the current leading answer, by @Sentry, to the question Where are all the slow neutrinos?

This [slow-neutrino induced nuclear decay] will still be an extremely rare process and the big problem is to distinguish it from normal spontaneous nuclear decay.

Questions which would need to be addressed as corollaries to the main question, I believe, include:

  • Is such a possibility self-consistent as a theory?

  • How does the required energy density of slow neutrinos compare to the postulated energy density of dark matter?

This thought was inspired by a comment from the current leading answer, by @Sentry, to the question Where are all the slow neutrinos?

This [slow-neutrino induced nuclear decay] will still be an extremely rare process and the big problem is to distinguish it from normal spontaneous nuclear decay.

Questions which would need to be addressed as corollaries to the main question, I believe, include:

  • Is such a possibility self-consistent as a theory?

  • How does the required energy density of slow neutrinos compare to the postulated energy density of dark matter?

1
source | link

Is it possible that all "spontaneous nuclear decay" is actually "slow neutrino" induced?

This thought was inspired by a comment from the current leading answer, by @Sentry, to the question Where are all the slow neutrinos?

This [slow-neutrino induced nuclear decay] will still be an extremely rare process and the big problem is to distinguish it from normal spontaneous nuclear decay.

Questions which would need to be addressed as corollaries to the main question, I believe, include:

  • Is such a possibility self-consistent as a theory?

  • How does the required energy density of slow neutrinos compare to the postulated energy density of dark matter?