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All kinds of weird things happen if you try to define temperature in a moving object. The paradox to me (not a generalized accepted answer) resolves by realizing that temperature should only be defined as measured when the object is stationary. Not only is not a scalar but it is not even well defined for areference frame in relative motion. http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/83488/is-temperature-a-lorentz-invariant-in-relativityIs temperature a Lorentz invariant in relativity?

Another problem to the ones you mentioned is , for a moving object that is at thermal equilibrium on its own reference frame, that as seen in the reference frame where the object is moving, the distribution of particles' velocities no longer follows the boltzmann distribution, not even relative to the center of mass: particles moving perpendicular to the motion of the object will not change its average velocity, but those moving parallel to the object will. In addition, because the compositions of velocities is non-linear, this deviation will neither be symmetrical between those moving in the same direction of the center of mass and those moving opposite to the center of mass.

All kinds of weird things happen if you try to define temperature in a moving object. The paradox to me (not a generalized accepted answer) resolves by realizing that temperature should only be defined as measured when the object is stationary. Not only is not a scalar but it is not even well defined for areference frame in relative motion. http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/83488/is-temperature-a-lorentz-invariant-in-relativity

Another problem to the ones you mentioned is , for a moving object that is at thermal equilibrium on its own reference frame, that as seen in the reference frame where the object is moving, the distribution of particles' velocities no longer follows the boltzmann distribution, not even relative to the center of mass: particles moving perpendicular to the motion of the object will not change its average velocity, but those moving parallel to the object will. In addition, because the compositions of velocities is non-linear, this deviation will neither be symmetrical between those moving in the same direction of the center of mass and those moving opposite to the center of mass.

All kinds of weird things happen if you try to define temperature in a moving object. The paradox to me (not a generalized accepted answer) resolves by realizing that temperature should only be defined as measured when the object is stationary. Not only is not a scalar but it is not even well defined for areference frame in relative motion. Is temperature a Lorentz invariant in relativity?

Another problem to the ones you mentioned is , for a moving object that is at thermal equilibrium on its own reference frame, that as seen in the reference frame where the object is moving, the distribution of particles' velocities no longer follows the boltzmann distribution, not even relative to the center of mass: particles moving perpendicular to the motion of the object will not change its average velocity, but those moving parallel to the object will. In addition, because the compositions of velocities is non-linear, this deviation will neither be symmetrical between those moving in the same direction of the center of mass and those moving opposite to the center of mass.

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All kinds of weird things happen if you try to define temperature in a moving object. The paradox to me (not a generalized accepted answer) resolves by realizing that temperature should only be defined as measured when the object is stationary. Not only is not a scalar but it is not even well defined for areference frame in relative motion. http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/83488/is-temperature-a-lorentz-invariant-in-relativity

Another problem to the ones you mentioned is , for a moving object that is at thermal equilibrium on its own reference frame, that as seen in the reference frame where the object is moving, the distribution of particles' velocities no longer follows the boltzmann distribution, not even relative to the center of mass: particles moving perpendicular to the motion of the object will not change its average velocity, but those moving parallel to the object will. In addition, because the compositions of velocities is non-linear, this deviation will neither be symmetrical between those moving in the same direction of the center of mass and those moving opposite to the center of mass.

All kinds of weird things happen if you try to define temperature in a moving object. The paradox to me (not a generalized accepted answer) resolves by realizing that temperature should only be defined as measured when the object is stationary. Not only is not a scalar but it is not even well defined for areference frame in relative motion.

Another problem to the ones you mentioned is , for a moving object that is at thermal equilibrium on its own reference frame, that as seen in the reference frame where the object is moving, the distribution of particles' velocities no longer follows the boltzmann distribution, not even relative to the center of mass: particles moving perpendicular to the motion of the object will not change its average velocity, but those moving parallel to the object will. In addition, because the compositions of velocities is non-linear, this deviation will neither be symmetrical between those moving in the same direction of the center of mass and those moving opposite to the center of mass.

All kinds of weird things happen if you try to define temperature in a moving object. The paradox to me (not a generalized accepted answer) resolves by realizing that temperature should only be defined as measured when the object is stationary. Not only is not a scalar but it is not even well defined for areference frame in relative motion. http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/83488/is-temperature-a-lorentz-invariant-in-relativity

Another problem to the ones you mentioned is , for a moving object that is at thermal equilibrium on its own reference frame, that as seen in the reference frame where the object is moving, the distribution of particles' velocities no longer follows the boltzmann distribution, not even relative to the center of mass: particles moving perpendicular to the motion of the object will not change its average velocity, but those moving parallel to the object will. In addition, because the compositions of velocities is non-linear, this deviation will neither be symmetrical between those moving in the same direction of the center of mass and those moving opposite to the center of mass.

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All kinds of weird things happen if you try to define temperature in a moving object. The paradox to me (not a generalized accepted answer) resolves by realizing that temperature should only be defined as measured when the object is stationary. Not only is not a scalar but it is not even well defined for areference frame in relative motion.

Another problem to the ones you mentioned is , for a moving object that is at thermal equilibrium on its own reference frame, that as seen in the reference frame where the object is moving, the distribution of particles' velocities no longer follows the boltzmann distribution, not even relative to the center of mass: particles moving perpendicular to the motion of the object will not change its average velocity, but those moving parallel to the object will. In addition, because the compositions of velocities is non-linear, this deviation will neither be symmetrical between those moving in the same direction of the center of mass and those moving opposite to the center of mass.