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There are two contradictory groups of statements from two different famous books on quantum physics.

Which one is correct?

Group (1) : Following statements are from Berkeley Physics Course Vol. 3, "Quantum Physics" by Wichmann, 1967

Page 204:

"The de-Broglie wave and the particle are the same thing; there is nothing else. The real particle found in nature, has wave properties and that is a fact."

Group (2): Following statements are from "An Introduction to Quantum Physics" by French & Taylor, 1978.

Page 234:

"When we come to particles other than photons, the wavelength again is a well-defined property, but only in terms of a large statistical sample. And for these other particles, we do not even have a seemingly concrete macroscopic property to associate with the wave, equivalent to electric and magnetic field of a beam of light. We arrive at the conclusion that the wave property is an expression of the probabilistic or statistical behavior of large number of identically prepared particles -- and nothing else!"

EDIT: According to 1st group, there is wave-particle duality. According to 2nd group, there are only particles (there are no waves) but the distribution of these particles (when they are detected) is wavy.

So which one is correct?

There are two contradictory groups of statements from two different famous books on quantum physics.

Which one is correct?

Group (1) : Following statements are from Berkeley Physics Course Vol. 3, "Quantum Physics" by Wichmann, 1967

Page 204:

"The de-Broglie wave and the particle are the same thing; there is nothing else. The real particle found in nature, has wave properties and that is a fact."

Group (2): Following statements are from "An Introduction to Quantum Physics" by French & Taylor, 1978.

Page 234:

"When we come to particles other than photons, the wavelength again is a well-defined property, but only in terms of a large statistical sample. And for these other particles, we do not even have a seemingly concrete macroscopic property to associate with the wave, equivalent to electric and magnetic field of a beam of light. We arrive at the conclusion that the wave property is an expression of the probabilistic or statistical behavior of large number of identically prepared particles -- and nothing else!"

There are two contradictory groups of statements from two different famous books on quantum physics.

Which one is correct?

Group (1) : Following statements are from Berkeley Physics Course Vol. 3, "Quantum Physics" by Wichmann, 1967

Page 204:

"The de-Broglie wave and the particle are the same thing; there is nothing else. The real particle found in nature, has wave properties and that is a fact."

Group (2): Following statements are from "An Introduction to Quantum Physics" by French & Taylor, 1978.

Page 234:

"When we come to particles other than photons, the wavelength again is a well-defined property, but only in terms of a large statistical sample. And for these other particles, we do not even have a seemingly concrete macroscopic property to associate with the wave, equivalent to electric and magnetic field of a beam of light. We arrive at the conclusion that the wave property is an expression of the probabilistic or statistical behavior of large number of identically prepared particles -- and nothing else!"

EDIT: According to 1st group, there is wave-particle duality. According to 2nd group, there are only particles (there are no waves) but the distribution of these particles (when they are detected) is wavy.

So which one is correct?

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Two contradictory groups of statements from two different books on quantum physics

There are two contradictory groups of statements from two different famous books on quantum physics.

Which one is correct?

Group (1) : Following statements are from Berkeley Physics Course Vol. 3, "Quantum Physics" by Wichmann, 1967

Page 204:

"The de-Broglie wave and the particle are the same thing; there is nothing else. The real particle found in nature, has wave properties and that is a fact."

Group (2): Following statements are from "An Introduction to Quantum Physics" by French & Taylor, 1978.

Page 234:

"When we come to particles other than photons, the wavelength again is a well-defined property, but only in terms of a large statistical sample. And for these other particles, we do not even have a seemingly concrete macroscopic property to associate with the wave, equivalent to electric and magnetic field of a beam of light. We arrive at the conclusion that the wave property is an expression of the probabilistic or statistical behavior of large number of identically prepared particles -- and nothing else!"