Imagine that there is a person who prefers to measure the amount of money in his bank account with the value $V$. The equation is $V = C\tanh N$, where $N$ is the actual amount of money in dollars. This person will also be confused:

Why is there a limit ($C$) on the amount of money that I can have? Is there any law that says the value of my money, $V$, cannot be more than $C$?

The answer is that he is just using a "wrong" variable to measure his assets. $V$ is not additive -- it is a transform of an additive variable, $N$, which he has to use in order for everything to make sense. And there is no "law of the universe" that limits the value of $V$ -- such a limit is just a product of his own stubbornness.

The same thing applies to measuringmeasure speed -- it is the "wrong" variable to describe the rate of motion; speed is not additive. The "correct" variable is called "rapidity" -- it is additive, and there is no limit on it.

Imagine that there is a person who prefers to measure the amount of money in his bank account with the value $V$. The equation is $V = C\tanh N$, where $N$ is the actual amount of money in dollars. This person will also be confused:

Why is there a limit ($C$) on the amount of money that I can have? Is there any law that says the value of my money, $V$, cannot be more than $C$?

The answer is that he is just using a "wrong" variable to measure his assets. $V$ is not additive -- it is a transform of an additive variable, $N$, which he has to use in order for everything to make sense. And there is no "law of the universe" that limits the value of $V$ -- such a limit is just a product of his own stubbornness.

The same thing applies to measuring speed -- it is the "wrong" variable to describe rate of motion; speed is not additive. The "correct" variable is called "rapidity" -- it is additive, and there is no limit on it.

Imagine that there is a person who prefers to measure the amount of money in his bank account with the value $V$. The equation is $V = C\tanh N$, where $N$ is the actual amount of money in dollars. This person will also be confused:

Why is there a limit ($C$) on the amount of money that I can have? Is there any law that says the value of my money, $V$, cannot be more than $C$?

The answer is that he is just using a "wrong" variable to measure his assets. $V$ is not additive it is a transform of an additive variable, $N$, which he has to use in order for everything to make sense. And there is no "law of the universe" that limits the value of $V$ such a limit is just a product of his own stubbornness.

The same thing applies to measure speed it is the "wrong" variable to describe the rate of motion; speed is not additive. The "correct" variable is called "rapidity" it is additive, and there is no limit on it.

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Well, imagineImagine that there is someonea person who prefers to measure the amount of money onin his bank account with the value $V$. WhichThe equation is equal to $V = C\tanh N$, where $N$ is the actual amount of money in dollars. That guyThis person will also be confused:

WHY thereWhy is there a limit ($C$) on the amount of money that I can have? Is there any law that I cannot havesays the value of my money, $V$, cannot be more than $C$  ?

The answer is that he is just using a "wrong" variable to measure his assets. $V$ is not additive -- it is a transform of an additive variable, $N$, which he has to use in order for everything to make sense. And there is no "law of the universe" that limits the value of $V$ -- thesuch a limit is just a product of his own stubbornness...

SameThe same thing with theapplies to measuring speed -- it is athe "wrong" variable to describe a rate of motion. Speedmotion; speed is not additive. The "correct" variable is called "rapidity" -- Itit is additive, and there is no limit on it.

Well, imagine that there is someone who prefers to measure the amount of money on his bank account with value $V$. Which is equal to $V = C\tanh N$, where $N$ is the actual amount of money in dollars. That guy will also be confused:

WHY there is a limit $C$ on the amount of money that I can have? Is there any law that I cannot have $V$ more than $C$  ?

The answer is that he is just using a "wrong" variable to measure his assets. $V$ is not additive -- it is a transform of an additive variable $N$, which he has to use in order for everything to make sense. And there is no "law of the universe" that limits the value of $V$ -- the limit is just a product of his own stubbornness...

Same thing with the speed -- it is a "wrong" variable to describe a rate of motion. Speed is not additive. The "correct" variable is called "rapidity" -- It is additive and there is no limit on it.

Imagine that there is a person who prefers to measure the amount of money in his bank account with the value $V$. The equation is $V = C\tanh N$, where $N$ is the actual amount of money in dollars. This person will also be confused:

Why is there a limit ($C$) on the amount of money that I can have? Is there any law that says the value of my money, $V$, cannot be more than $C$?

The answer is that he is just using a "wrong" variable to measure his assets. $V$ is not additive -- it is a transform of an additive variable, $N$, which he has to use in order for everything to make sense. And there is no "law of the universe" that limits the value of $V$ -- such a limit is just a product of his own stubbornness.

The same thing applies to measuring speed -- it is the "wrong" variable to describe rate of motion; speed is not additive. The "correct" variable is called "rapidity" -- it is additive, and there is no limit on it.

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Well, imagine that there is someone who prefers to measure the amount of money on his bank account with value $V$. Which is equal to $V = C\tanh N$, where $N$ is the actual amount of money in dollars. That guy will also be confused:

WHY there is a limit $C$ on the amount of money that I can have? Is there any law that I cannot have $V$ more than $C$ ?

The answer is that he is just using a "wrong" variable to measure his assets. $V$ is not additive -- it is a transform of an additive variable $N$, which he has to use in order for everything to make sense. And there is no "law of the universe" that limits the value of $V$ -- the limit is just a product of his own stubbornness...

Same thing with the speed -- it is a "wrong" variable to describe a rate of motion. Speed is not additive. The "correct" variable is called "rapidity" -- It is additive and there is no limit on it.