Post Made Community Wiki by Qmechanic
2 added 57 characters in body
source | link

R. Shankar's book is a really good transitory book between Griffiths and Sakurai (commonly used in grad. schools) as it begins by building up a solid linear algebra foundation, doesn't shy away from Dirac notation (something that Griffiths annoyingly does), and begins to delve into the group theoretical aspects of the subject. I'd also recommend picking up Dirac's book, if only for its poetic aspects. If you feel comfortable enough with Shankar, then I'd suggest you go straight to Sakurai. I'd also recommend picking up Dirac's book, both because it ensures that you understand the foundations well and also for its poetry.

R. Shankar's book is a really good transitory book between Griffiths and Sakurai (commonly used in grad. schools) as it begins by building up a solid linear algebra foundation, doesn't shy away from Dirac notation (something that Griffiths annoyingly does), and begins to delve into the group theoretical aspects of the subject. I'd also recommend picking up Dirac's book, if only for its poetic aspects. If you feel comfortable enough with Shankar, then I'd suggest you go straight to Sakurai.

R. Shankar's book is a really good transitory book between Griffiths and Sakurai (commonly used in grad. schools) as it begins by building up a solid linear algebra foundation, doesn't shy away from Dirac notation (something that Griffiths annoyingly does), and begins to delve into the group theoretical aspects of the subject. If you feel comfortable enough with Shankar, then I'd suggest you go straight to Sakurai. I'd also recommend picking up Dirac's book, both because it ensures that you understand the foundations well and also for its poetry.

1
source | link

R. Shankar's book is a really good transitory book between Griffiths and Sakurai (commonly used in grad. schools) as it begins by building up a solid linear algebra foundation, doesn't shy away from Dirac notation (something that Griffiths annoyingly does), and begins to delve into the group theoretical aspects of the subject. I'd also recommend picking up Dirac's book, if only for its poetic aspects. If you feel comfortable enough with Shankar, then I'd suggest you go straight to Sakurai.