3 it's not Auto engine/cycle, but Otto engine/cycle after Nikolaus Otto
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On the P-V diagram for the Carnot cycle the upper and lower curves are very close together. As a result, this cycle has very little area enclosed within the cycle diagram and very little work is done per cycle. Therefore, to produce a reasonably useful quantity of work the engine must be very massive, heavy, and expensive relative to other engines based on other cycles like the AutoOtto cycle and the Diesel cycle which enclose more area on the P-V diagram and do much more work per cycle.

A larger engine with a relatively larger amount of surface area will sustain greater losses to the environment through that surface area reducing its efficiency and partially or completely offsetting any other advantages it may have. This larger engine will also have to move more mass of working fluid through it to produce the same work output as some other engine cycle with greater work output per cycle increasing the internal flow losses and again reducing the real world efficiency of the Carnot enginen relative to others. A heavier engine will also penalize a vehicle with greater per mile energy consumption once again offsetting any other advantages the Carnot cycle may present.

Bottom line, real Carnot engines can not be designed to compete with real AutoOtto or Diesel engines on an overall economic basis.

On the P-V diagram for the Carnot cycle the upper and lower curves are very close together. As a result, this cycle has very little area enclosed within the cycle diagram and very little work is done per cycle. Therefore, to produce a reasonably useful quantity of work the engine must be very massive, heavy, and expensive relative to other engines based on other cycles like the Auto cycle and the Diesel cycle which enclose more area on the P-V diagram and do much more work per cycle.

A larger engine with a relatively larger amount of surface area will sustain greater losses to the environment through that surface area reducing its efficiency and partially or completely offsetting any other advantages it may have. This larger engine will also have to move more mass of working fluid through it to produce the same work output as some other engine cycle with greater work output per cycle increasing the internal flow losses and again reducing the real world efficiency of the Carnot enginen relative to others. A heavier engine will also penalize a vehicle with greater per mile energy consumption once again offsetting any other advantages the Carnot cycle may present.

Bottom line, real Carnot engines can not be designed to compete with real Auto or Diesel engines on an overall economic basis.

On the P-V diagram for the Carnot cycle the upper and lower curves are very close together. As a result, this cycle has very little area enclosed within the cycle diagram and very little work is done per cycle. Therefore, to produce a reasonably useful quantity of work the engine must be very massive, heavy, and expensive relative to other engines based on other cycles like the Otto cycle and the Diesel cycle which enclose more area on the P-V diagram and do much more work per cycle.

A larger engine with a relatively larger amount of surface area will sustain greater losses to the environment through that surface area reducing its efficiency and partially or completely offsetting any other advantages it may have. This larger engine will also have to move more mass of working fluid through it to produce the same work output as some other engine cycle with greater work output per cycle increasing the internal flow losses and again reducing the real world efficiency of the Carnot enginen relative to others. A heavier engine will also penalize a vehicle with greater per mile energy consumption once again offsetting any other advantages the Carnot cycle may present.

Bottom line, real Carnot engines can not be designed to compete with real Otto or Diesel engines on an overall economic basis.

2 added 297 characters in body
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On the P-V diagram for the Carnot cycle the upper and lower curves are very close together. As a result, this cycle has very little area enclosed within the cycle diagram and very little work is done per cycle. Therefore, to produce a reasonably useful quantity of work the engine must be very massive, heavy, and expensive relative to other engines based on other cycles like the Auto cycle and the Diesel cycle which enclose more area on the P-V diagram and do much more work per cycle.

A larger engine with a relatively larger amount of surface area will sustain greater losses to the environment through that surface area reducing its efficiency and partially or completely offsetting any other advantages it may have. This larger engine will also have to move more mass of working fluid through it to produce the same work output as some other engine cycle with greater work output per cycle increasing the internal flow losses and again reducing the real world efficiency of the Carnot enginen relative to others. A heavier engine will also penalize a vehicle with greater per mile energy consumption once again offsetting any other advantages the Carnot cycle may present.

Bottom line, real Carnot engines can not be designed to compete with real Auto or Diesel engines on an overall economic basis.

On the P-V diagram for the Carnot cycle the upper and lower curves are very close together. As a result, this cycle has very little area enclosed within the cycle diagram and very little work is done per cycle. Therefore, to produce a reasonably useful quantity of work the engine must be very massive, heavy, and expensive relative to other engines based on other cycles like the Auto cycle and the Diesel cycle which enclose more area on the P-V diagram and do much more work per cycle.

A larger engine with a relatively larger amount of surface area will sustain greater losses to the environment through that surface area reducing its efficiency and partially or completely offsetting any other advantages it may have. A heavier engine will also penalize a vehicle with greater per mile energy consumption once again offsetting any other advantages the Carnot cycle may present.

Bottom line, real Carnot engines can not be designed to compete with real Auto or Diesel engines on an overall economic basis.

On the P-V diagram for the Carnot cycle the upper and lower curves are very close together. As a result, this cycle has very little area enclosed within the cycle diagram and very little work is done per cycle. Therefore, to produce a reasonably useful quantity of work the engine must be very massive, heavy, and expensive relative to other engines based on other cycles like the Auto cycle and the Diesel cycle which enclose more area on the P-V diagram and do much more work per cycle.

A larger engine with a relatively larger amount of surface area will sustain greater losses to the environment through that surface area reducing its efficiency and partially or completely offsetting any other advantages it may have. This larger engine will also have to move more mass of working fluid through it to produce the same work output as some other engine cycle with greater work output per cycle increasing the internal flow losses and again reducing the real world efficiency of the Carnot enginen relative to others. A heavier engine will also penalize a vehicle with greater per mile energy consumption once again offsetting any other advantages the Carnot cycle may present.

Bottom line, real Carnot engines can not be designed to compete with real Auto or Diesel engines on an overall economic basis.

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On the P-V diagram for the Carnot cycle the upper and lower curves are very close together. As a result, this cycle has very little area enclosed within the cycle diagram and very little work is done per cycle. Therefore, to produce a reasonably useful quantity of work the engine must be very massive, heavy, and expensive relative to other engines based on other cycles like the Auto cycle and the Diesel cycle which enclose more area on the P-V diagram and do much more work per cycle.

A larger engine with a relatively larger amount of surface area will sustain greater losses to the environment through that surface area reducing its efficiency and partially or completely offsetting any other advantages it may have. A heavier engine will also penalize a vehicle with greater per mile energy consumption once again offsetting any other advantages the Carnot cycle may present.

Bottom line, real Carnot engines can not be designed to compete with real Auto or Diesel engines on an overall economic basis.