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You can keep on adding higher order derivatives until they become vanishingly small. A convenient point of entry to this topic would be the Wikipedia article Jerk (physics).

Bear in mind that when you're in a car, jerk is only of relevance during the time when the accelerator pedal is actually moving, to a first-order approximation.

Update: It seems a question with a great deal of relevance to yours was posed a few hours ago on math.se - What is an example of an application of a higher order derivative ($y^{(n)}$, $n≥4$)?What is an example of an application of a higher order derivative ($y^{(n)}$, $n≥4$)?. Arturo's answer expands on higher derivatives in kinematics (jounce!), whilst Greg's answer includes a source of jerk in driving I didn't consider (steering).

You can keep on adding higher order derivatives until they become vanishingly small. A convenient point of entry to this topic would be the Wikipedia article Jerk (physics).

Bear in mind that when you're in a car, jerk is only of relevance during the time when the accelerator pedal is actually moving, to a first-order approximation.

Update: It seems a question with a great deal of relevance to yours was posed a few hours ago on math.se - What is an example of an application of a higher order derivative ($y^{(n)}$, $n≥4$)?. Arturo's answer expands on higher derivatives in kinematics (jounce!), whilst Greg's answer includes a source of jerk in driving I didn't consider (steering).

You can keep on adding higher order derivatives until they become vanishingly small. A convenient point of entry to this topic would be the Wikipedia article Jerk (physics).

Bear in mind that when you're in a car, jerk is only of relevance during the time when the accelerator pedal is actually moving, to a first-order approximation.

Update: It seems a question with a great deal of relevance to yours was posed a few hours ago on math.se - What is an example of an application of a higher order derivative ($y^{(n)}$, $n≥4$)?. Arturo's answer expands on higher derivatives in kinematics (jounce!), whilst Greg's answer includes a source of jerk in driving I didn't consider (steering).

3 update
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You can keep on adding higher order derivatives until they become vanishingly small. A convenient point of entry to this topic would be the Wikipedia article Jerk (physics).

Bear in mind that when you're in a car, jerk is only of relevance during the time when the accelerator pedal is actually moving, to a first-order approximation.

Update: It seems a question with a great deal of relevance to yours was posed a few hours ago on math.se - What is an example of an application of a higher order derivative ($y^{(n)}$, $n≥4$)?. Arturo's answer expands on higher derivatives in kinematics (jounce!), whilst Greg's answer includes a source of jerk in driving I didn't consider (steering).

You can keep on adding higher order derivatives until they become vanishingly small. A convenient point of entry to this topic would be the Wikipedia article Jerk (physics).

Bear in mind that when you're in a car, jerk is only of relevance during the time when the accelerator pedal is actually moving, to a first-order approximation.

You can keep on adding higher order derivatives until they become vanishingly small. A convenient point of entry to this topic would be the Wikipedia article Jerk (physics).

Bear in mind that when you're in a car, jerk is only of relevance during the time when the accelerator pedal is actually moving, to a first-order approximation.

Update: It seems a question with a great deal of relevance to yours was posed a few hours ago on math.se - What is an example of an application of a higher order derivative ($y^{(n)}$, $n≥4$)?. Arturo's answer expands on higher derivatives in kinematics (jounce!), whilst Greg's answer includes a source of jerk in driving I didn't consider (steering).

2 note about period of applicability of jerk
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You can keep on adding higher order derivatives until they become vanishingly small. A convenient point of entry to this topic would be the Wikipedia article Jerk (physics).

Bear in mind that when you're in a car, jerk is only of relevance during the time when the accelerator pedal is actually moving, to a first-order approximation.

You can keep on adding higher order derivatives until they become vanishingly small. A convenient point of entry to this topic would be the Wikipedia article Jerk (physics).

You can keep on adding higher order derivatives until they become vanishingly small. A convenient point of entry to this topic would be the Wikipedia article Jerk (physics).

Bear in mind that when you're in a car, jerk is only of relevance during the time when the accelerator pedal is actually moving, to a first-order approximation.

1
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