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The idea here is increasingly complex depending on how deep into modern physics you want to delve, but also key to understanding quantum mechanics. So, I'll give a bit deeper explanation than it seems you've seen, but there's plenty more.

It's understood that a photon acts both as a particle and a wave. As a particle it has an amount of energy associated with it, and as a wave it has a wavelength and frequency. These two values are directly related; you can know one from the other.

A good first thought experiment is to consider a particle in a hypothetical one-dimensional box. It can only bounce back and forth along one direction and in a finite distance. It will settle into any one of a number of quantized states thay have a wavelength that "fit," as I'm guessing you understand from your studies.

Extend that idea to an electron, then, which is confined to "orbit" the atom. It is three dimensional and the forces involved are not infinite potential barriers, but the idea of the particle's wave settling into a frequency that "fits" still holds.

Now, when an atom absorbs or emits a photon, the energy is absorbed into or emitted by one of the quantized electrons, causing it to gain or lose energy equal to that of the photon. Since the electron can only have discrete amounts of energy, we can cakculatecalculate the energy of the photons emitted!

The idea here is increasingly complex depending on how deep into modern physics you want to delve, but also key to understanding quantum mechanics. So, I'll give a bit deeper explanation than it seems you've seen, but there's plenty more.

It's understood that a photon acts both as a particle and a wave. As a particle it has an amount of energy associated with it, and as a wave it has a wavelength and frequency. These two values are directly related; you can know one from the other.

A good first thought experiment is to consider a particle in a hypothetical one-dimensional box. It can only bounce back and forth along one direction and in a finite distance. It will settle into any one of a number of quantized states thay have a wavelength that "fit," as I'm guessing you understand from your studies.

Extend that idea to an electron, then, which is confined to "orbit" the atom. It is three dimensional and the forces involved are not infinite potential barriers, but the idea of the particle's wave settling into a frequency that "fits" still holds.

Now, when an atom absorbs or emits a photon, the energy is absorbed into or emitted by one of the quantized electrons, causing it to gain or lose energy equal to that of the photon. Since the electron can only have discrete amounts of energy, we can cakculate the energy of the photons emitted!

The idea here is increasingly complex depending on how deep into modern physics you want to delve, but also key to understanding quantum mechanics. So, I'll give a bit deeper explanation than it seems you've seen, but there's plenty more.

It's understood that a photon acts both as a particle and a wave. As a particle it has an amount of energy associated with it, and as a wave it has a wavelength and frequency. These two values are directly related; you can know one from the other.

A good first thought experiment is to consider a particle in a hypothetical one-dimensional box. It can only bounce back and forth along one direction and in a finite distance. It will settle into any one of a number of quantized states thay have a wavelength that "fit," as I'm guessing you understand from your studies.

Extend that idea to an electron, then, which is confined to "orbit" the atom. It is three dimensional and the forces involved are not infinite potential barriers, but the idea of the particle's wave settling into a frequency that "fits" still holds.

Now, when an atom absorbs or emits a photon, the energy is absorbed into or emitted by one of the quantized electrons, causing it to gain or lose energy equal to that of the photon. Since the electron can only have discrete amounts of energy, we can calculate the energy of the photons emitted!

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source | link

The idea here is increasingly complex depending on how deep into modern physics you want to delve, but also key to understanding quantum mechanics. So, I'll give a bit deeper explanation than it seems you've seen, but there's plenty more.

It's understood that a photon acts both as a particle and a wave. As a particle it has an amount of energy associated with it, and as a wave it has a wavelength and frequency. These two values are directly related; you can know one from the other.

A good first thought experiment is to consider a particle in a hypothetical one-dimensional box. It can only bounce back and forth along one direction and in a finite distance. It will settle into any one of a number of quantized states thay have a wavelength that "fit," as I'm guessing you understand from your studies.

Extend that idea to an electron, then, which is confined to "orbit" the atom. It is three dimensional and the forces involved are not infinite potential barriers, but the idea of the particle's wave settling into a frequency that "fits" still holds.

Now, when an atom absorbs or emits a photon, the energy is absorbed into or emitted by one of the quantized electrons, causing it to gain or lose energy equal to that of the photon. Since the electron can only have discrete amounts of energy, we can cakculate the energy of the photons emitted!