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bio website dariocortese.weebly.com
location Bristol, United Kingdom
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Oct 21 at 16:01

Knowledge and understanding are quite different. Only understanding can lead to being, whereas knowledge is nothing but a passing presence in it. (G.Gurdjieff)


Jul
4
suggested suggested edit on de Sitter and anti de Sitter metric
Jul
4
comment Does irrotational imply inviscid?
Done, but I have to disagree on your last sentence. A potential flow is one for which only the condition of irrotationality can arise (and not necessarily the incompressibility). To have a stream function it is enough to have just the incompressibility condition (and not necessarily the irrotationality).
Jul
4
comment Does irrotational imply inviscid?
Do you want me to switch in my auto-answer?
Jul
4
revised Does irrotational imply inviscid?
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Jul
4
revised Meaning of angular velocity in a rotating system
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Jul
4
revised Meaning of angular velocity in a rotating system
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Jul
4
revised Meaning of angular velocity in a rotating system
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Jul
4
answered Meaning of angular velocity in a rotating system
Jul
3
comment Rotation of parabola
I edited, maybe this is more clear! Isn't it?
Jul
3
revised Rotation of parabola
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Jul
3
revised Rotation of parabola
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Jul
3
answered Rotation of parabola
Jul
3
awarded  Organizer
Jul
3
revised Can a scientific theory ever be absolutely proven?
I added the tag epistemology
Jul
3
suggested suggested edit on Can a scientific theory ever be absolutely proven?
Jul
3
revised Does irrotational imply inviscid?
edited body
Jul
3
revised Does irrotational imply inviscid?
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Jul
3
answered Does irrotational imply inviscid?
Jul
3
comment Does irrotational imply inviscid?
I retry to formulate my question and give a possible answer : for irrotationality I have laplacian of the velocity equal to zero, so that I can just write the Euler equation, no matter the viscosity. If the fluid is even quasi-inertia-less, I neglet the inertia term (this is an approximation that must pass through the density and characteristic lenght and velocities) , and I get $\nabla p = \boldsymbol 0$, which is the actual low-Re irrotational equation.
Jul
3
comment Does irrotational imply inviscid?
At first, thanks for the answers. Actually, this was the reason I took the 2D case (K.theorem) "However, in that case you typically want to preserve the viscous term." I can't, because the laplacian of $u$ vanishes, and I usually work with low Re flows with the incompressible condition satisfied.