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47m
answered If all motion is relative, how does light have a finite speed?
2d
comment Is it possible to use electromagnetic waves to power an entire city
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because the first sentence begins with "I have a theory"
Jul
3
comment Assuming the possibility that a ship could reach $c$, how long would it take?
This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful.
Jul
2
comment Two apparent contradictions in SR involving time dilation and length contraction
"We wish to know which clock runs more slowly." According to which (or what) clock? Do you see the hidden (false) premise in the quoted question? According to SR, there are an infinity of inertial reference frames in which clock A runs slower than B as well as an infinity of inertial reference frames in which clock B runs slower than clock A. But this isn't a paradox in SR which is easy to see using a spacetime diagram. See, for example: physics.stackexchange.com/a/111089/9887
Jun
23
revised potential difference across a bulb
added 86 characters in body
Jun
23
comment potential difference across a bulb
Unexplained downvotes are common here. I would hazard a guess that the downvoter was annoyed by the "check my work" nature of the question. See, for example, this meta post: meta.physics.stackexchange.com/q/6159/9887
Jun
23
comment potential difference across a bulb
@user7348, I understood your message but you didn't understand mine. Please see my update.
Jun
23
revised potential difference across a bulb
added 1245 characters in body
Jun
23
comment potential difference across a bulb
@user7348, I'm quite aware of how to solve this problem exactly as well as how to solve it approximately as in the above. Go ahead and downvote, it will only diminish you. In fact, I insist that you downvote it.
Jun
23
answered potential difference across a bulb
Jun
23
comment potential difference across a bulb
The 100 ft extension cord is composed of two 100 ft conductors and these conductors and bulb are indeed series connected. Thus, the fastest way to find the voltage across the bulb is to use voltage division. You know the resistance of the 200 ft of conductor and the approximate resistance of the bulb is easily calculated.
Jun
23
comment potential difference across a bulb
Hint: do a sanity check. Most household receptacle circuits (in the US) have a 15A (or perhaps 20A) circuit breaker and, as you know, connecting a 100W light bulb (more or less) directly to a duplex outlet does not cause the circuit breaker to trip. Does it seem even remotely plausible that connecting a 100W light bulb with a 100ft extension cord will result in about 180A of current?
Jun
17
comment QM without complex numbers
@igael, thanks and I've updated the link.
Jun
17
revised QM without complex numbers
edited body
Jun
15
awarded  Yearling
May
28
answered Quality Factor in a Parallel LC Circuit
May
6
comment Vibrating Objects
Have you considered, for example, a loudspeaker and audio amplifier?
May
6
comment Vibrating Objects
Extremely quickly is not precise. Do you have a particular frequency (range) in mind?
May
2
comment Could the 4 Forces Split Off or “Decay” into Other Forces in the Distant Future?
Related: Vacuum decay
May
1
comment Colliding black holes to an outside observer
What does a binary black hole merger look like?