2,486 reputation
1839
bio website none.seriously
location Switzerland
age 30
visits member for 4 years, 5 months
seen yesterday

Physicist.


Mar
25
revised How does insulating footwear prevent an electric shock?
added 5 characters in body; edited title
Mar
24
comment Motion described by $m \frac{\mathrm{d}^2 x}{\mathrm{d}t^2}=-k\frac{\mathrm{d}^{\frac12 }x}{\mathrm{d}t^{\frac12}}$
@user121330 Unfortunately I never came around to that :/ It's still on my TODO-list, but rather at the bottom, right after "analytically solve the Navier-Stokes equations" (which would be more profitable)
Mar
16
comment Will an object always fall at an infinite speed in a black hole?
There is no such thing as infinite speed, it is always $\le c$. What may grow indefinitely is momentum
Mar
12
comment Can quaternion math be used to model spacetime?
Thanks for the follow up - hey, so long as you don't write "I was gonna write a longer answer reply here, but there is not enough space in this margin"... :D
Mar
12
comment Can quaternion math be used to model spacetime?
@Mike Then you should have a Greasemonkey-script to auto-upvote any answer mentioning him :P
Mar
12
comment Can quaternion math be used to model spacetime?
Awesome answer! Do Octonions fit in here for some higher dimension, too?
Mar
12
comment Can quaternion math be used to model spacetime?
Great question, every now and then I wondered about this but usually when in a train without SE-accesss...
Feb
18
comment Is there a maximum frames per second (FPS)?
Whether the Planck-Time has any physical meaning (especially a limiting one) is to date not known. And as Ryan's answer shows, uncertainty yields much lower framerates (for VIS at least)
Jan
8
comment What is the “Pidebuck” generalization of Buckingham π about?
Aww crap, looking at the German version of that site an additional table exists which links things like Temperature <-> Empathy, Luminous Intensity <-> Transcendence... If this is what I fear it is, please feel free to close this question as off-topic :/ But maybe that's just a weird interpretation of an actually useful concept...
Jan
8
asked What is the “Pidebuck” generalization of Buckingham π about?
Jan
8
comment Fundamental question about the Buckingham $\pi$ theorem (dimensional analysis)
@AsphirDom You arrive at $K=GM$ by stating that, since $F_g = mg$ by actio=reactio one must also have $F_g = Mg'$, where $g'$ denotes the gravity caused by mass $m$ acting on $M$. Therefore, $K\propto M$ and the proportionality factor is labelled $G$. Of course $G$ might still be a function of $K,r,g$ without further investigation...
Jan
8
comment Why do we need to know the shape of the slide to find the time to slide down it?
@Jim "all physics problems take place in a vacuum anyway" indeed :P
Jan
4
comment Why do the errors in a formula depend on how it's written?
@CuriousOne Usually you measure the resistance via current and voltage, so current and resistance are more likely to be correlated than not
Jan
4
revised Why do the errors in a formula depend on how it's written?
added 387 characters in body
Jan
4
answered Why do the errors in a formula depend on how it's written?
Nov
28
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
27
comment Why is quantum entanglement considered to be an active link between particles?
While I agree that Luboš's answer is superior to this one, I do wonder why it was downvoted - any improvement suggestions?
Nov
18
comment How does interpreting negative energy electrons as positrons solve the negative energy problem?
@Dave you can use classical electrodynamics for that, when you swap the sign of all time derivatives and of all charge terms in the Maxwell equations, they remain the same.
Nov
18
answered How does interpreting negative energy electrons as positrons solve the negative energy problem?
Nov
12
awarded  Notable Question