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1d
comment What would Negative Energy act like?
Casimir effect?
Nov
23
comment What sort of “mass” is explained by the Higgs mechanism?
Actually, I'm not sure about my answer anymore. Some other posts around here have me wondering if the Higgs field interacts in other ways...
Nov
23
comment Is charge transfer from A to B positive or negative?
My question is isomorphic to the situation whereby a positron moving backward in time is equivalent to an electron moving in forward in time. One could say charge is moving through time, but without the specific type of charge and direction of time, such a statement is ambiguous.
Nov
23
comment Is charge transfer from A to B positive or negative?
I mean, the example is already known to me. I know how that process works. My question is on the terminology of the very specific phrase "charge transfer".
Nov
23
asked Is charge transfer from A to B positive or negative?
Nov
19
comment Can an elementary particle be reduced to its properties?
I've always wondered if there was a more abstract way to categorize particles/fields simply as a list of properties, transformation rules of those properties with time, and interaction rules with other particles/fields. I feel like it would simplify or at least consolidate things for me.
Nov
16
comment Is there any physical simulator precise to atomic levels and quantum effects?
Certainly! LAMMPS is what I use. It's optimized for large systems like supercomputers. But NAMD and Gromacs are also very popular.
Nov
16
answered Is there any physical simulator precise to atomic levels and quantum effects?
Nov
13
accepted Dimensionality of Hilbert space
Nov
12
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
12
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
11
comment How legit is this paper claiming to have observed Hawking radiation?
Probably pretty legit. It's a Nature Physics paper, so it's been highly scrutinized by experts in the field. It may be a little sensationalistic since it's an analogue system, but they still have novel conclusions.
Nov
10
comment What is the entropy of a pure state?
(Well, more specifically I suppose f and g would give expectation values for those two quantities).
Nov
10
comment What is the entropy of a pure state?
Sorry, I guess this answer confuses me further. Suppose you have an isolated frying pan floating deep in space. One could say the Hamiltonian for the wavefunction of the whole frying pan is time independent, since it's so isolated. What I want to know is how to go from this single, pure, high-dimensional wavefunction to an entropy or temperature. In other words, functionals f and g such that f(Ψ) = S and g(Ψ) = T. Surely S and T are defined for this system, without invoking the notion of "subsystems".
Nov
10
comment What is the entropy of a pure state?
"Consider a system with more than one subsystem." What is the rigorous definition of a subsystem? How is a multidimensional wavefunction broken down, mathematically, into subsystems?
Nov
9
comment What is the entropy of a pure state?
Classically? Basically the heat-engine way it was originally defined.
Nov
9
asked What is the entropy of a pure state?
Nov
9
comment What solution do I need to use in this question?
I disagree. Leaving them unanswered is just kind of rude. At least close the question and explain why.
Nov
9
comment Is energy affected by forces?
It's more accurate to say gravity is affected by energy. Specifically, the stress-energy tensor. If you heated a rod, there would be an increased gravitational force (albeit negligible) between the rod and the black hole. Also, black holes are not anti-matter. That is something different.
Nov
8
comment Is many-body Hamiltonian valid in strong-correlated system
I didn't realized the Coulomb law was a derived approximation. So this isn't as fundamental as it gets for quantum chemistry?