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location Las Vegas
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visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Oct 3 '13 at 1:30

Since graduating school Dec. 2011 with a BS in Physics, I've decided to take the free time that I have and pursue my interest in computer security, networks, and operating systems. Originally I planned on going for a masters in CPE/EE for embedded programming in neat projects like UAVs, however I was pretty burnt out. Since college I've learned that taking courses and skimming through books to ace a tests isn't really learning. True learning is doing something with what you know and for that, I felt a little reluctant to go back for my masters.

Now I'm learning everything that I've wanted to on my own and I've developed some cool projects for myself like a simple cooked socket webserver, client browser, kernel keylogger, and now I'm learning to write shellcode. My future plans include getting a CCNA certificate for the summer and hopefully with that I can land a job. Though I hope that in the future that I can eventually be employed as a white hat. Other then that I can't say much else about myself.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
May
30
comment Time Reversal Invariance in Quantum Mechanics
I see what your saying about returning quantum information from the universe to create the original wave function, but I still can't get past the catch 22. If we ran 3 consecutive experiments, one after another ... you know that you would get random results with each measurement. Given that we reversed time and redid the experiment, quantum mechanics would fail if the results were the same. I can however see that there is always the off chance in going forward in the same future with the same results .. its just probability. Though doing unmeasurements, I agree would spit the original wavefxn
May
30
comment Time Reversal Invariance in Quantum Mechanics
@knives : Ya, I did treat the problem quantum mechanically going back in time. My question was spurred because I think most people think of going back into time as a classical newtonian problem as you said. My thoughts were, what have you if going back to your original wave-function you had to go through quantum mechanics as well. I was thinking of it the way you just put it.
May
23
awarded  Scholar
May
23
accepted Time Reversal Invariance in Quantum Mechanics
May
23
comment Time Reversal Invariance in Quantum Mechanics
I can see what your saying if you apply a time-dependent potential into the equation. Actually, between your point, Spot's article, and Rennie's response my question seems a bit more clear. Given a time-independent equation, the wavefunction should be constant for all time which agrees with my statement ... however the measurement itself is not a time independent problem as you said. Spots article however shows that quantum info is never lost, its just dispersed throughout the universe which is on par to Rennie's response. It makes sense to me now, thanks.
May
23
comment Time Reversal Invariance in Quantum Mechanics
I see your point and I never really thought of it from the stand point of a broken eggshell fixing itself. My previous argument I suppose is that once broken, its not possible to go back to the previous states. So if we were traveling back in time wouldn't we have to perform operations that would undue the effects from measuring (breaking the eggshell)? I can't think of a way measurement operations can be interverted and reapplied to the particle to undue the measurement ... not unless we prepare the particle the way we previously had.
May
23
awarded  Supporter
May
23
comment Time Reversal Invariance in Quantum Mechanics
Thanks. I'm thinking about getting back into research, I haven't heard of anyone tackling a question such as this. This might be something that I would like to take on since I'm unemployed with ample time on my hand. Its interesting that you mentioned this to be an observed characteristic in scattering.
May
22
awarded  Student
May
22
asked Time Reversal Invariance in Quantum Mechanics