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bio website kylheku.com
location Vancouver, Canada
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visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Nov 25 at 17:04

Check out the TXR language http://www.nongnu.org/txr


Jul
18
comment If there were fundamental forces weaker than gravity, would we know about it?
@Void The arrow clearly points outside of Slovakia, somewhere in Poland. Moreover, the entire rectangle around the "landscape" is understood to be the "swamp", not only some small area near the tip of the arrow.
Apr
8
comment Why isn't jumping from a high altitude fatal?
First paragraph lacks a relative clause "After seeing ..... (stuff in parentheses) ___ WHAT?"
Jan
20
comment Very strange shadow phenomenon
Diffraction. I learned about this in the fifth grade.
Nov
24
comment Why are radiators always placed under windows?
@PPG Yes, but your desk has space underneath for the air to flow and probably some clearance from its edge to the legs. If there is a radiator or baseboard heater, under the window, it's easier to put a desk there than, say, a dresser cabinet (even one that is short enough not to extend past the windowsill). Cabinets will have a small cutaway for baseboard trim; that's about it.
Nov
19
comment Why don't metals bond when touched together?
@deed02392 Note that large flat objects pressed together are also hard to separate simply due to atmospheric pressure. The space between them is a void, and air has to rush in when you separate them. Early in the separation, the crevice through which air can get in is small.
Nov
19
comment Why don't metals bond when touched together?
@jcw An electric current can break through the oxidation layers. This is called fritting. Though not an instance of welding, it explains why high voltage electrical contacts don't have to be maintained much. Even a pretty tarnished appliance plug, for instance, will work fine. But, say, small-signal connectors (e.g. audio) will not perform well if they are not clean and polished. (It's good for high voltage connectors to be in good condition too, so that fritting doesn't have to be relied on so much. A high initial contact resistance that has to be broken down could briefly generate heat.)
Nov
15
comment How to measure speed of a ceiling fan?
Hopefully, paramedics won't have to be called.
Oct
19
comment What's inside a proton?
@DavidZ Because due to surpassing some hotness threshold or whatever, it has appeared in the stackexchange-network-wide list of hot questions, which creates a positive feedback loop of upvoting.
Oct
19
comment What's inside a proton?
Note that "empty space" is just a philosophical abstraction. Ultimately, space is the name we give to that handy utility which prevents everything from occupying the same spot. How much space is between two particles depends on how fat you consider them to be: where is the boundary between what is in the particle and what is outside. This is complicated by the boundary being fuzzy: just a sort of density function, which is not even time-invariant.
Oct
18
comment What's inside a proton?
Inside specially marked protons, there is a prize! Get yours today!
Sep
29
comment Why does burning things make them black?
@fzlogic And elemental carbon can be a hard, transparent crystal: diamond.
Aug
28
comment Why do chimneys have these spiral “wings”?
Is this vortex shedding why cables whine in the wind? It seems not unlike what happens in some blown-hole woodwind instruments, too.
Jul
17
comment How can you weigh your own head in an accurate way?
@Ali I didn't even notice that, and it's in the question's very first edit. Be that as it may, it's not a reasonable constraint. The question doesn't justify why it's not a good idea.
Jul
15
comment Are quantum effects significant in lens design?
So, if the lens is not round, the world according to Stan Rogers explodes, because the single photon ends up out of focus with itself. :) Thus, lenses must be round to protect the world. QED, by QED.
Jul
10
comment How much energy is consumed by a aircraft to maintain a speed of sound?
"Other necessary assumptions?" Okay, the air craft is a long, thin rod about the diameter of a pencil, with tiny wings. No wait, it's a 500 kg jet engine, dragging behind it a large diameter open parachute made of 400 kg of nylon.
Jul
10
comment Paraphrasing speed and heat capacity
Definitely "heat per temperature". A higher heat capacity object requires more heat to raise its temperature by a degree Celsius. "Temperature per heat" would be something else, like "heat elasticity/elastance" perhaps (terminology mine).
Jun
29
comment Are there old aged particles?
Yes it does mean there are no old particles. For us to call one particle old and another not old, we have to be able to identify some artifacts of age in those particles.
Jun
27
comment How can I stand on the ground? EM or/and Pauli?
Why don't these same mechanisms prevent matter-antimatter annihilation? An atom's electrons don't crash into the protons in the nucleus, yet happily annihilate with anti-matter's positrons.
Jun
27
comment How can I stand on the ground? EM or/and Pauli?
Purely according to electrostatics, all of the charges in a solid want to crash together into a point. Every + wants to annihilate every -. The fact that some object is spread into the volume that it occupies means that charges are separated: a position of high energy. Without something else to prevent all those particles from collapsing, they would merge into a single massive prticle that carries no net charge.
Jun
27
comment What's a “noninertial frame”?
The masses are not the frame. The frame is the coordinate system with respect to which you measure the position of the masses.