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location Cambridge, MA
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visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Aug 20 at 18:58

Aug
20
answered Why Do Objects move?
Apr
28
comment Why Earth is not a cuboid?
I'll agree with that. It helps to be liquid, certainly, but it's not required.
Apr
28
comment Is simultaneity testable?
Can you give a little more information as to what the Andromeda paradox is, just in case people haven't heard of it?
Apr
28
answered Why Earth is not a cuboid?
May
14
awarded  Yearling
May
6
comment Terminal velocity?
You mention "all collisions are inelastic"; are you given the amount of elasticity in the problem, or are you just speaking from your own thoughts on that one?
May
6
answered Would atmosphere of Jupiter blow up if I launched a atomic bomb there?
May
14
awarded  Yearling
Mar
27
comment How do permanent magnets manage to focus field on one side?
Since I don't have this in front of me: Are you certain that the whole thing is actually a magnet? Is it possible that they are just backed with a thick layer of some similar-looking substance that prevents them from getting close together and exerting a strong repulsive force?
Aug
11
comment Triple slit experiment
But it does state that blocking one of the slits in the double-slit destroys the pattern. To my understanding, detecting the passing photon with minimal disruption to it does not destroy the double-slit pattern.
Aug
11
comment Triple slit experiment
True, but so does the original question.
Aug
9
comment Why do people rule out local hidden variables?
I will note that the free will vs. determinism debate often assumes that probability plays no role. You may be better served by thinking of not a sliding scale between "free will" and "determinism," but as a triangle with "randomness" at the third point. If there's a philosophy stackexchange site, that's probably the place to ask about free will.
Aug
9
comment Is quantum perturbation theory taught in college?
Additional supporting data points: It was taught in the undergrad classes I took at RPI. We did not get into field theory or second quantization.
Aug
8
answered Triple slit experiment
Jul
12
comment Why do we think of light as a wave?
You are correct - that's what I get for simplifying my language too far.
Jul
2
awarded  Commentator
Jul
2
comment Could someone remind me of what we mean by zero electric field “inside” a conductor?
"Inside a conductor" usually is taken to mean literally within the medium of the conductor - in the metal. The example @jak is using would normally be phrased as "in a pocket..." or "in a bubble..." or "in a cavity within the conductor".
Jun
28
answered Simulator for electrostatics
Jun
21
comment Why do we think of light as a wave?
I didn't vote it down, but there are three things that struck me about your answer. First, it's a little incoherent and could be better organized. Second, you attribute interference patterns to particle behavior, when they're actually wave behavior. Third, you answered with material that seems to be way above the level of the original post, and would probably just be confusing. Those are probably why people voted your answer down.
Jun
20
answered Why do we think of light as a wave?