170 reputation
4
bio website cagrav.blogspot.com
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Mar 13 at 14:36

Feb
28
awarded  Commentator
Feb
28
comment Do objects sink in ice?
This calls for an experiment!
Feb
28
accepted Do objects sink in ice?
Feb
28
comment Do objects sink in ice?
@Carl, not all creationists are trolls. I consider myself one though I have no problems with evolution or modern cosmology. The Everett interpretation gives me heartburn sometimes, but we'll see how that turns out.
Feb
27
comment Do objects sink in ice?
Interesting. There is a corollary proposed by some creationists that since these plains were covered so rapidly, 260 feet (79.2 meters) in 40 years, certain core samples could not be as old as they are said to be. I was attempting to refute this particular proposition, or at least answer it as honestly as I can. I'm thinking another approach would be the change in density from the surface downward. I doubt it is constant, and I doubt it is linear. Thanks for your help.
Feb
27
comment Do objects sink in ice?
But would this continue to happen when the object reaches the freezing point of water?
Feb
27
asked Do objects sink in ice?
Jan
30
comment If one is travelling at a significant fraction of $c$, will the length of the trip be shortened?
@Jim I haven't decided on the delta-v yet. I was thinking something close to Earth's gravity (1g), but more would be fine especially with inertial negators in tow. :) As far as reasonable time, I'd say a few years.
Jan
30
asked If one is travelling at a significant fraction of $c$, will the length of the trip be shortened?
May
31
awarded  Supporter
May
31
comment Is the opening of the NOVA program a Calabi-Yau space?
It is actually best seen in the closing credits of every current Nova episode. ow.ly/bgOKn I've always wondered if it was meant to be one.
May
30
asked Is the opening of the NOVA program a Calabi-Yau space?
May
2
comment In what sense does the universe have an outer edge?
@RonMaimon, a function with an infinite number of variables? Hey, that sounds like causality. All of the possible values for all of the possible variables within the manifold of spacetime. Am I mistaken? You assume that I have enough back knowledge to make sense of these pages on Wikipedia. I do go there. That's how I got the basic definition of Hilbert space, but it still didn't serve to explain what it is for me. What you said was a lot clearer.
May
2
comment In what sense does the universe have an outer edge?
@RonMaimon: I see. Does it describe particles in superposition then? Its all quite a bit foggy. I'm starting to realize how people feel when I talk about technology. It is the Math that keeps me from really understanding. I'm trying to visualize these very non-intuitive ideas.
May
2
comment In what sense does the universe have an outer edge?
@RonMaimon: You mean like particle wavefunctions? Like how a particle exists as a wave function throughout all of spacetime? Like probability waves? I'm still unclear.
May
2
awarded  Scholar
May
2
accepted In what sense does the universe have an outer edge?
May
2
comment In what sense does the universe have an outer edge?
Ok, I have an answer, albeit still very foggy. Suskind's surface is, in fact, the cosmological horizon? I thought it also might be the surface around any arbitrary region of space. I take it Hilbert space is a generalized form of Euclidean space that can have n dimensions. I can kind of see what a density-matrix is, sort of. I don't know what de Setter space is. I don't actually have a degree in any of this. I really need to finish reading "The Road to Reality."
May
2
awarded  Student
May
2
asked In what sense does the universe have an outer edge?