Ben Collins

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visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen May 4 '12 at 13:59

I'm an engineer with a desire to understand the deeper principles of the technologies that I use. I'm not a physicist so please bear with me.


May
4
answered Which new insight did $E=mc^2$ give us?
Apr
27
comment How fictitious are fictitious forces?
I think the statement "Psuedoforces are equal to the mass of the body in question times the acceleration of the frame, in the opposite direction" is the most enlightening comment so far. So on Earth, the centrifugal 'force' always acts directly 'upwards' and is equal to mv^2/r. The coriolis force however, Earth's tangential vecolicity is constant and therefore there is no tangential pseudoforce. Therefore where does Corioils originate? I assume it's something to do with the fact that the earth's radius about its axis of spin is not constant?
Apr
27
comment How fictitious are fictitious forces?
This example doesn't seem analogous to the example in my question. In my example, static friction is keeping the vehicle stationary in it's frame on the Earth, while in yours you are suggesting that that static friction is overcome and the object slips? Could you rephrase the example please?
Apr
27
awarded  Scholar
Apr
27
accepted How fictitious are fictitious forces?
Apr
26
comment How fictitious are fictitious forces?
OK then let's get practical, back to the turreted vehicle on earth. The designer of the turret's traverse motors has a requirement to rotate the turret mass at a certain rate under all conditions. This requirement is stringent enough that the turret designer has to account for the effect of the coriolis force during design. If this is the case isn't that enough for us earth-bound folk to consider the force real in earth's frame?
Apr
26
comment How fictitious are fictitious forces?
I believe I understand the use of psuedo forces now. They are required to account for the effects of accelerations on the frame we are observing from in order to allow Newton's laws to be used effectively. Does the magnitude of the acceleration affect their use though? On Earth we are not aware of the fact that we are in a non-inertial frame as the accelerations we are experiencing are so small. What if the earth was spinning much faster and we could physically feel this centrifugal force? What if the earth is spinning so fast that friction can no longer maintain our 'stationary' position?
Apr
26
comment How fictitious are fictitious forces?
Why is the trajectory a curve? I may have only accelerated the graph paper in one direction for a brief moment.
Apr
24
awarded  Student
Apr
24
comment How fictitious are fictitious forces?
Then these forces are in fact very real? We are all constantly experiencing them yet they are so small they are virtually impossible for us to detect without precise measuring equipment? Is 'ficticious force' therefore a misleading term or does it have some other implication?
Apr
24
asked How fictitious are fictitious forces?