294 reputation
218
bio website ericmenze.com
location Minneapolis, MN
age 29
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen 14 mins ago

I'm a Computer (Web) Programmer/Analyst based in Anchorage, AK and Minneapolis, MN. I use (among other things) ASP.NET, C# and SQL Server.

I build things. Bicycles, computers, websites, guitars, cars, motorcycles, sound sytems... lots of things.


Sep
14
comment Could the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle turn out to be false?
"it has been proven experimentally that it is not possible" -- what has? Because negative statements (especially those about impossibilities) are extraordinarily difficult to prove. It is a derivable fact that in a wave-form, certain values are non-commutative operators that are fourier transforms of each other. It has not been proven conclusively that a waveform is the only correct model of subatomic particles under all conditions everywhere in the universe and at all times. If it has, please provide sources.
Sep
14
comment Could the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle turn out to be false?
Sure, in the context of medium temperatures, medium gravity, low strength electromagnetic fields on earth, yes, the electron seems to be behave like a wave. I've got that. But THEN to turn it around and say Therefore the electron can ONLY be modeled as a wave, ALWAYS, in black holes, at absolute zero, in hyper-strength electric fields, always and forever and never deviates EVER is the part that is an extraordinary claim which I have yet to hear conclusively justified. It does not seem to follow from the evidence. Electron can be modeled as a wave sometimes = True. Electron IS ONLY a wave...?
Sep
14
comment What would be likely to completely stop a subatomic particle assuming it was possible?
Please see my other question, if you haven't already, though perhaps that will just annoy you as well.
Sep
14
revised Could the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle turn out to be false?
fixed spelling
Sep
14
comment What would be likely to completely stop a subatomic particle assuming it was possible?
"There can never be a completely arrested particle, under any conditions, ever, at any time and under any circumstance" is an extraordinary claim, and the evidence for it is surprisingly vapid. ("We use that assumption to make a theory, and the theory's accurate from our limited corner of the universe with limited means of observation and measurement").
Sep
14
comment What would be likely to completely stop a subatomic particle assuming it was possible?
It's tolerable to say 'the non-commutation of wave-forms is an assumption of QM, and we need that for QM to work', and continue with the theory. It's then great to move to 'IF particles can be represented as wave-forms always and everywhere, at every time, under all conditions, QM is likely true.' It's not then okay to jump to 'therefore our assumption for the theory is unquestionable and shouldn't even be discussed.' The way this is treated seems completely indistinguishable to me from a faith/god claim - just assume the X, therefore it is true. Then rationalize God after the fact using X.
Sep
14
comment What would be likely to completely stop a subatomic particle assuming it was possible?
You started with a good line of reasoning, then you justified that everything must obey the uncertainty principle because we observe (so far) that electrons obey it which is a bit of circular logic. Then you end up criticizing the question, which is the exact prejudice that made me ask it in the first place.
Sep
14
comment How much does the curvature of space change the volume of Earth by?
Your comment 'laughably small' made me look up the Schwarzschild Radius of the Earth. Turns out $r_s = 8.87*10^{-3} = 9mm$
Sep
14
comment Lever Mechanics - How to formulate an ideal lever launch
For efficiency, should $E_{in}$ be ${PE}_{weight}$ or ${PE}_{system}$? (as in, factoring the weight of the projectile into the equation or not)
Sep
14
revised Lever Mechanics - How to formulate an ideal lever launch
Updated PE_system formula to include starting position of m_projectile
Sep
14
revised Lever Mechanics - How to formulate an ideal lever launch
Updated PE_system formula to include starting position of m_projectile
Sep
14
asked Lever Mechanics - How to formulate an ideal lever launch
Sep
14
answered Lever Mechanics - How to formulate an ideal lever launch
Sep
13
revised Could we make a trebuchet that could launch objects to a stable orbit?
Added quicklaunch reference.
Sep
13
revised Would a rocket burn more fuel to get from Earth's surface to LEO, or to get from LEO to GEO?
Clarified what m_2 was
Sep
13
comment Would a rocket burn more fuel to get from Earth's surface to LEO, or to get from LEO to GEO?
Yes, sorry. I didn't want to repeat $m_0$ and $m_1$.
Sep
13
comment Would a rocket burn more fuel to get from Earth's surface to LEO, or to get from LEO to GEO?
It should also be noted that $v_e$, by contrast, will exponentially relieve fuel requirements ($m_p = 1 - e^{-\frac{\Delta V}{e_v}}$. If we could accelerate the exhaust to 300 km/s instead of just 4.5 km/s (1% of c), then it would only take 3% of $m_0$ to get from the surface to LEO.
Sep
13
comment Would a rocket burn more fuel to get from Earth's surface to LEO, or to get from LEO to GEO?
Completely agreed, which is why I used the word 'ease' - it backs the percentage of fuel requirement down by some non-trivial amount, but it's still a large percentage of your starting mass.
Sep
13
revised Would a rocket burn more fuel to get from Earth's surface to LEO, or to get from LEO to GEO?
Corrected mass of the propellant from LEO -> GEO
Sep
13
comment Calculation of Distance from measured Acceleration vs Time
The model rocket will experience some amount of 'tipping' and may even reverse direction on descent, which will skew your measurements by providing smaller z accelerations than accurate, and then by adding to the position when falling, respectively. On a ground based vehicle x and y might be useful, but once you introduce suspension it really needs a gyroscope to track the roll, pitch, and yaw of the accelerometer to have much accuracy.