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I've got a BS in Physics from the University of Rochester, and I'm over half-way through my masters in optical engineering. I work at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, where I develop and maintain technology for the Omega EP laser.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laboratory_for_Laser_Energetics


Mar
20
comment How can KVL & KCL be derived from Maxwell equations?
You can't, because it isn't.
Mar
18
comment How can KVL & KCL be derived from Maxwell equations?
For a rough estimate of the scale of the problem, you could take the speed of light divided by the length scale of your apparatus. That will give you a frequency scale for the problem. Frequencies significantly smaller than that scale can be approximated as static fields.
Mar
18
comment How can KVL & KCL be derived from Maxwell equations?
Maybe you aren't familiar with the practice in the physical sciences of making approximations. A law that holds under some conditions will (often) hold approximately when those conditions are only approximately satisfied. What qualifies as a sufficiently close approximation depends on the scale of the system in question. For electromagnetic devices of reasonable size, "slowly varying" can mean quite rapid variation.
Mar
16
comment How can KVL & KCL be derived from Maxwell equations?
Yes, as Ali said.
Mar
15
comment How can KVL & KCL be derived from Maxwell equations?
Approximately, yes.
Mar
12
comment How can KVL & KCL be derived from Maxwell equations?
Small numbers are approximately zero.
Mar
9
comment How can KVL & KCL be derived from Maxwell equations?
@rza : That's why she specified "in the absence of a time varying magnetic field".
Jan
3
comment Why doesn't an electron feel an electric field, and thus accelerate whilst inside the drift tube of a linear accelerator?
It is most definitely not fine to approximate a moment in time as static. If that were always the case we would not even need electrodynamics! That approximation can only be made when the fields are changing sufficiently slowly that dynamic effects are insignificant. Accelerators operate at Radio frequency, so a static approximation isn't reasonable.
Dec
26
comment Is it possible to focus the sun in such way?
Lenses do not increase power. Also, if that first mirror is particularly reflective, it will reflect the same from both sides. You cannot create a mirror that's only reflective from one direction.
Dec
16
awarded  Yearling
Oct
18
comment Arduino Servo Torque Calculation for a Automated Telescope
No, it would not. I think you might be confused about something. A counterweight would result in the load remaining stationary in any position unless an external force were applied. That way large servos are not required. All the servo needs to overcome is bearing friction and the inertia of the telescope.
Oct
18
comment Arduino Servo Torque Calculation for a Automated Telescope
Right, which is very unbalanced. The typical way to solve this problem is a counterweight, as Martin suggested.
Oct
9
comment Periodicity of interference pattern from two light sources?
Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/630
Oct
8
comment Why is it difficult to differentiate between interference and diffraction?
I'd consider your description to be of one of the common effects of diffraction of an optical field around an edge. The resulting fringe pattern is called "diffraction" by many. However, in optics we would say that any optical field propagates via diffraction, even in the absence of any obstruction. For example, if I shine a laser at the moon and I want to calculate how wide the beam would be when it gets there, I'd calculate the optical field at the moon due to diffraction propagation, using a Fraunhofer diffraction integral.
Oct
8
answered Why is it difficult to differentiate between interference and diffraction?
Sep
11
comment formula for transparency of very thin film of metal
Related to this, which I answered a couple years ago: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/1094/…
Sep
6
comment Smaller Airy disk with another lens?
Numerical Aperture. It's roughly $\frac{1} {2 F} $ where $F$ is the f number.
Sep
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
5
comment C Method for Diffraction grating
I won't have time to look at the paper until tomorrow, but if matlab is giving you a dimension mismatch, you're having a problem with your code, not your math.
Aug
3
awarded  Necromancer