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 Yearling
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May
21
comment Reducibility of tensor products of Lorentz group representations
I would recommend checking out Georgi's text in particular, he gives a nice presentation how to decompose reducible representations.
May
21
comment Reducibility of tensor products of Lorentz group representations
Relevant: physics.stackexchange.com/q/6108
May
13
comment Seiberg Duality Applications
While your question(s) is reasonable, your last sentence is quite off-putting honestly. You state`...I would like to know if it is worth the effort'. If you are interested in something go study it, if not then go find something that you are interested in. My point being as you start doing research and looking into advanced topics you will constantly confronted with this question ' is it worth it' - only you can answer that for yourself.
May
8
answered De Broglie wavelength of slow moving macroscopic objects
May
8
comment Physical question on an RLC circuit
@Carlos - your welcome, glad I could be of assistance!
May
8
answered Physical question on an RLC circuit
May
3
comment Question Regarding Lorentz Transformation
For the velocity equation: As a general rule of thumb, equations like this should make sense in the non-relativistic limit as well. Taking this limit you would obtain $v_b = v_a - u$. Now you should be answer the question yourself...
Apr
24
comment Uncoupling a coupled oscillator Hamiltonian by change of variables
Have you verified for yourself that the ground state of a single harmonic oscillator gives you $ \hat{H} \psi_0 = E_g \psi_0$ ? If so, then since your ground state wave function is the product of two wavefunctions and your Hamiltonian is the sum of two decoupled harmonic oscillators, then your desired result should follow immediately.
Apr
23
reviewed Approve Infinite Resistive lattice problem
Apr
11
awarded  Yearling
Apr
7
comment What forbids the existence of a $\lambda (A^\mu A_\mu)^2$ term in the Stueckelberg action?
Note: the renormalizability is only restored in the abelian case with this trick. In the non-abelian case you have a nonlinear sigma model, which has a higher cut off, but its still non-renormalizable.
Apr
6
comment Minimal vs. Non-minimal coupling in General Relativity
I think its best to not get to caught up in this question in the specific context of GR. That is, look at the question in the more general context of gauge theories and effective field theory. For a discussion, see the reference: arxiv.org/abs/1305.0017
Apr
3
comment Anomalous Dimensions of Gauge Interactions
Where do they say this?
Mar
24
comment What does BICEP2's results tell us about gravitation waves and quantum gravity?
Thanks for the links.
Mar
19
comment What does BICEP2's results tell us about gravitation waves and quantum gravity?
@sunspots - thanks for the link. I read all the blogs already, but I am looking for a something more technical than Strassler's explanation.
Mar
19
asked What does BICEP2's results tell us about gravitation waves and quantum gravity?
Mar
11
comment Which types of particles are affected by the wave-particle duality?
The largest thing I have heard of is buckyballs: univie.ac.at/qfp/research/matterwave/c60
Mar
10
comment Why quantising gravity necessarily give us gravitons?
To make the graviton a fermion would be more than a 'tweak'.
Feb
27
comment How to study physics as a first year student?
Lastly, you will simply not have time to do even half the problems in the back of each chapter. So again just put some faith in the the instructor as its his/her job to help you navigate through all this. Definitely do all the problems assigned and ask you professor if there are extra problems they might recommend. This way you can maximize the number of problems you are doing while keeping on pace with the class.
Feb
27
comment How to study physics as a first year student?
It is your professors job to help you navigate through the textbook, so don't get to caught up in trying to do this by yourself. Moreover, Halliday is a pretty big textbook that is typically not covered in its entirety in even 3 semesters at most US schools.