28,940 reputation
456129
bio website www3.imperial.ac.uk/…
location London, United Kingdom
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 1 min ago

I'm a PhD student at the CDT in Controlled Quantum Dynamics at Imperial College London. My research is on strong-field and ultrafast physics, and I mostly study tunnel ionization and high-harmonic generation.

Check out my papers - they're nice!

You can also check out my Master's dissertation, "Under-the-barrier electron-ion interactions during tunnel ionization" at arXiv:1307.7329 or on my CDT homepage.

I did my Bachelor's degree in Physics in Mexico at the Faculty of Science at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). I studied quantum optics for my dissertation with Eduardo Nahmad Achar, and I have some nice results on the Jordan-block structure of the annihilation operator (as well as what became the J Phys A paper). You can find it (in Spanish) in the UNAM thesis repository.


4h
answered Quantum computing can be done via measurement alone, why is this significant?
5h
revised Quantum computing can be done via measurement alone, why is this significant?
Language and formatting fixes.
5h
comment Hot water from a faucet
"Perfectly safe to drink" as long as there are no other factors involved. Which often do exist. It's generally as safe to drink as the cold tap, though.
5h
comment How to visualize a Schrödinger cat state?
Thanks for the catch. Fixed.
5h
revised How to visualize a Schrödinger cat state?
deleted 2 characters in body
19h
comment Does new energy creation exist?
You are probably thinking of the baryon asymmetry problem, which is simply the fact that we don't observe much antimatter lying around. This is a puzzle, because there is a matter/antimatter asymmetry observed in the universe but not in the known physical laws which we think created it. An experimental observation of such an asymmetry in physical law would be groundbreaking and essentially solve the puzzle.
19h
comment Does new energy creation exist?
No experiment has ever shown the result you mention ('when you collide a particle and its anti-energy equivalent, there are more 'positive' emissions that anti-emissions'). Physics as observed in earthbound labs is symmetrical between matter and antimatter (i.e. if photons decay, equal amounts of particles and antiparticles are produced). If you can find the specific source where you heard this we can debunk it or clear up the confusion.
19h
comment Why do atomic clocks only use caesium?
I'm not sure it belongs here, though. There are two parts of the answer, "because there is a standard which we all need to follow or we're not quite sure we're talking about the same thing", and then "we chose caesium as the standard because...". The original post as posed is well answered by the first (and your) answer - Pinki would have to elaborate on how much detail they are after.
19h
revised Why do atomic clocks only use caesium?
Minor language fixes.
19h
comment Why do atomic clocks only use caesium?
This sort of still begs the question of why caesium was chosen as the standard, though.
19h
reviewed Edit Why do atomic clocks only use caesium?
19h
revised Why do atomic clocks only use caesium?
Further language fixes.
21h
comment Separability of the Hilbert space: countable orthonormal basis vs. continuous spectrum
@wondering If this answer was helpful, consider 'accepting' it by clicking on the checkmark to the left.
1d
comment What did Tesla mean by “there is no energy in matter”?
It's good to know that the dinosaurs at the Natural History Museum are still alive. They're just a bit quiet now that they've been 'transformed'.
1d
revised coulomb collision
Transcribed quotation image.
1d
comment Why doesn't Many-Worlds interpretation talk about many worlds?
In the spirit of this answer, I rather dislike the name 'many worlds'; I tend to go with "Taking Quantum Mechanics at Face Value". Whether that's a wise thing to do is another matter, but the question many-worlds asks is 'what would the world look like to us, made as we are of atoms, if quantum mechanics held all the way up the ladder?'. Not an uninteresting question at all.
2d
comment Numerically summing a divergent series
If your series Cesaro converges (as in your second example) then you can approximate the Cesaro limit numerically in the obvious way. If you want to do an analytical continuation argument, as in your first example, there's no numerics that will help you, ever. (And, in the latter case, you need to be extraordinarily careful with what you mean by "meaningful".)
2d
comment Numerically summing a divergent series
Me, just now. If you have an analytical expression you might be able to make an analytical continuation argument if you're really careful, but numerically summing a divergent series won't get you anywhere.
2d
comment Numerically summing a divergent series
"None that are numerical."
2d
comment What operation does a beam splitter apply?
Sort of. It's more like "a linear transformation between the input and output mode operators which gives equal weight to both inputs on both outputs, with an added phase to ensure that operation is unitary, and for which the details depend on the context and should be worked out in specifics on a case by case basis", though really changing conventions doesn't really affect anything much.