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15h
comment The force of gravitation
Done. meta.physics.stackexchange.com/a/7470/854 is my new "goto" link.
17h
comment Circular Waveguide (for dominant mode)
se.u.94y.info for a list of potentially helpful resources
17h
comment Numerical problem related to Newton's Law of Gravitation
se.u.94y.info for a list of potentially helpful resources
17h
comment Speed of light interpretation
I actually understand this question, but it's fairly silly (and off-topic). Given any finite length open interval, a given "chunk" (photon?) of light will only remain in that open interval for a finite time (like a good guest?), instead of remaining there indefinitely. This applies even if the finite open interval consists of a non-vacuum. In other words, many things can slow light down (eg, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bose%E2%80%93Einstein_condensate), but nothing can stop it.
17h
comment WHO WAS FIRST TIME OR MOTION?
I think you're talking about one form of Zeno's Paradox here. It's interesting, but it's also clear that motion and velocity do exist. You might try Philosophy. Feel free to contact me directly (contact info in profile), as questions like this interest me, even though they're not appropriate for this site.
17h
comment Equation of trajectory using Maupertuis principle
se.u.94y.info for a list of potentially helpful resources, although I think you need other data (eg, initial conditions) to make this computation.
17h
comment The force of gravitation
se.u.94y.info for a list of potentially helpful resources, but: the forces are equal, and yes, the Earth moves, but only a very small amount.
17h
comment Electronics - Series/Parallel Circuit Question
se.u.94y.info for a list of potentially helpful resources
1d
comment Buoyancy project
@thalaron This site is physics.se. It's just a short way of saying physics.stackexchange.com. It's a bit inaccurate, since physics.se could also be its own domain, but that's not how it's meant here.
Apr
28
comment Plucking Guitar Strings
se.u.94y.info for a list of potentially helpful resources
Apr
28
comment Can the second law of thermodynamics be violated in a small enough system if tried repeatedly enough?
google.com/search?q=decrease+in+quantum+entropy shows a few papers which point out that, yes, at a quantum level, entropy can decrease.
Apr
28
comment Difference in time for clock in attic vs clock in cellar
se.u.94y.info for a list of potentially helpful resources. Hint: gravity.
Apr
27
comment Two inertial frames (different angles)
Are you confused on both parts of the problem, or just the relativistic parts?
Apr
27
comment Why does't the use of the same number of significant digits result in consistent result?
physics.stackexchange.com/questions/227942/… is probably unhelpful.
Apr
27
comment Reversing Entropy
You've invented the "swamp cooler": en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evaporative_cooler -- I personally don't understand exactly how it works, but it's well-known and doesn't break the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. Quantum mechanics guarantees that the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics must fail at the quantum level (quantum microentropy), but no one has found a way to use this yet. Note also that there are already plenty of sources of free energy: solar, wind, geothermal, and many many more.
Apr
27
comment Find the time (in seconds) Tom would need to catch Jerry
se.u.94y.info for a list of potentially helpful resources
Apr
27
comment Find force using mass, $x$ and $y$ coordinate
se.u.94y.info for a list of potentially helpful resources
Apr
27
comment how to solve this question?
se.u.94y.info for a list of potentially helpful resources
Apr
26
comment Thought experiment on special relativity
As your velocity increases, you'd notice the distance between two stars (for example) as decreasing, which would contradict the Newtonian belief that the distance between two objects remains the same unless they are moving relative to each other. Of course, it's possible that you'd just say the stars are moving closer together, but even their shapes would change from spherical to oblong.
Apr
26
comment In the GPS system, does the satellite clock see the earthbound clock moving slower, due to relativity?
That's an extremely high velocity for a GPS satellite. Assuming the satellite remained in orbit, it would also have to accelerate significantly. And, when accelerating, it would age less than the nearly-inertial Earth frame. Thus, it would see Earth clocks going faster, not slower.