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Jan
24
asked Same amount of light, spread across larger surface area = more reflection?
Jan
17
comment Can the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle be explained intuitively?
@HotLicks: I never understood what Schrodinger's cat was doing in that box in the first place...
Jan
15
comment Can the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle be explained intuitively?
I find it pretty intuitive that measuring a system involves interacting with it (do you not?) and that interacting with a system whose state you don't already know (otherwise you would not be measuring it) affects its state in an unpredictable way (otherwise if it was predictable then, again, you would have already known its state). Does this help or is it still unintuitive?
Dec
22
comment How do we know that the cosmic background radiation comes from the early universe?
@annav: Maybe we mean different things by "contradiction"? Basically, my confusion earlier stems from this: if you think A should always equal B, but it turns out A > B, then you can just claim A = B + C for some C that you can't explain, and now bingo! suddenly the quantity A is magically "conserved" like it was supposed to, and your theory no longer contradicts anything, by definition. It seems like you can prevent any contradictions if you're happy with introducing variables that account for it, even if you don't understand them. Dark matter seems to be one such variable... is it not?
Dec
22
comment How do we know that the cosmic background radiation comes from the early universe?
Is dark matter not a result of an unexplained contradiction?
Nov
18
awarded  Good Question
Aug
27
awarded  Yearling
Aug
20
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
6
comment Do all the conservation laws of Physics take no time to propagate?
I don't understand your logic. Even if the law was an equation written on a piece of paper that needed to be communicated to the whole universe, this communication would have already occurred before any interaction was to happen. It's not even "not even wrong"...
Jul
13
comment Why are angles dimensionless and quantities such as length not?
@gonenc: Because a maximum sets a natural reference point. A minimum is always there, and if you have a maximum then (value - minimum) / (maximum - minimum) is a natural unitless quantity that gives you all the information you need to determine the value. Otherwise you have to pick a different reference point, and that's where you get units.
Jul
13
comment Why are angles dimensionless and quantities such as length not?
@gonenc: Minimum ≠ Maximum
Jul
13
comment Why are angles dimensionless and quantities such as length not?
@gonenc: I know exactly what you're trying to say but I think you also know what I'm trying to say.
Jul
13
answered Why are angles dimensionless and quantities such as length not?
Jul
13
comment Which one to learn first: Special or general relativity?
@leftaroundabout: I haven't done the former but I imagine it might be easier since the tires are wider...?
Jul
7
comment Does spacetime position not form a four-vector?
@GennaroTedesco: It's called "succinct" :P
Jun
30
comment In atomic bomb tests under ground, where does the volume of the rocks go?
How does rock being porous leak (gamma?) radiation at such a great depth...? I'm confused.
Jun
14
comment How does the heat of Sun come on Earth when there is no medium?
Same way its light comes...?
Jun
1
comment Why does a match go out if you hold it so the flame is up?
I see, thanks!!
Jun
1
comment Why does a match go out if you hold it so the flame is up?
This is really interesting, but I don't understand how wood can "decompose" in such a short amount of time in any way other than by "burning"... could you describe what you mean by decomposition?
May
16
comment How electrons move so fast in a electric circuit?
there's nothing special about the electron near your fingertips compared to the one at the lightbulb; either one can light it up