382 reputation
1414
bio website
location
age
visits member for 4 years, 5 months
seen May 20 at 7:47

May
16
comment How electrons move so fast in a electric circuit?
there's nothing special about the electron near your fingertips compared to the one at the lightbulb; either one can light it up
May
14
comment Do delay differential equations (DDEs) ever describe real-world phenomena?
@CuriousOne: Your comment is the one that completely misses the point of my question.
May
14
comment Do delay differential equations (DDEs) ever describe real-world phenomena?
@CuriousOne: Don't get too philosophical about what I mean when I say "approximation". I mean it in the obvious and common sense. For example, for the purposes of my question, when writing down the equation of the dynamics of a swinging pendulum, the original nonlinear equation would be considered exact, whereas the simple harmonic motion equation is (obviously) considered an approximation. Hence the true dynamics are nonlinear, but the approximation is linear. Similarly, linear friction is obviously an approximation. My question is, do DDEs ever describe true dynamics, or only approximations?
May
14
comment Do delay differential equations (DDEs) ever describe real-world phenomena?
+1 your answer makes me realize my question is actually related to my previous question!
May
14
comment Do delay differential equations (DDEs) ever describe real-world phenomena?
@JohnRennie: Thanks for the link! I'm looking at it right now, but I don't understand why this should require anyone to review the area... all it would take to answer this question is either a simple "no", or a "yes, here's the DDE that governs [some physical effect]"... it should be a pretty short answer either way.
May
14
asked Do delay differential equations (DDEs) ever describe real-world phenomena?
May
11
comment Is Interpretation of state vectors and density matrices according to Frequentist or Bayesian interpretation of probability?
@MarkMitchison: It'd be nice if you could actually quote the part you're talking about; I'm looking through those pages and I can't seem to find any part that esplicitly talks about hidden random variables.
May
11
comment Is Interpretation of state vectors and density matrices according to Frequentist or Bayesian interpretation of probability?
@MarkMitchison: Could you link me to something?
May
11
comment Is Interpretation of state vectors and density matrices according to Frequentist or Bayesian interpretation of probability?
@MarkMitchison: I always thought the theorems you mentioned weer regarding hidden deterministic variables, not hidden random variables.
May
11
comment Is Interpretation of state vectors and density matrices according to Frequentist or Bayesian interpretation of probability?
A hidden deterministic variable might cause problems but would a hidden random variable cause problems? If anything, I would imagine it would imply Bayesian is more correct than frequentist...
May
8
answered How does one determine an inertial frame?
May
6
comment Do the electric and magnetic components of an electromagnetic wave really generate each other?
@Luaan: I actually thought the correct version was one in which one wave grows as the other one dies, but I guess I was wrong...
Apr
28
comment Why do electrons, according to my textbook, exist forever?
If we consider that the electron is not a particle but really a probability density, can we use that to overcome the idea of a reference frame? Since in that case there's no single reference frame... I imagine it's an infinite number each with some probability.
Mar
30
comment In an electron-positron annihilation, in what direction are the photons released?
They don't necessarily have to go in opposite directions, because sometimes other particles (e.g. neutrinos) are released. I don't remember which interactions release them and which ones don't, though.
Mar
30
comment If the Earth is a good conductor of electricity, why don't people get electrocuted every time they touch the Earth?
Do you get electrocuted every time you pick up a wire?
Mar
24
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
8
awarded  Custodian
Mar
8
reviewed Reject (Why) is dumping liquid nitrogen on your head dangerous?
Feb
21
awarded  Critic
Feb
21
comment Why are electromagnetic waves called waves even though they don't travel through a medium?
-1 Saying "waves are called waves because they are solutions to a wave equation" completely inverts the rationale. The equation is called the wave equation because it describes waves. Waves came first, and the equations describing them came second and were named after them, not the other way around.