Reputation
7,799
Top tag
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
19 45
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~246k people reached

1d
reviewed Approve Differential cross-section for a 2-particle process in the LAB frame
1d
comment Can a grounded spherical shell have a charge?
Corrected the phrase to "Grounded"
1d
revised Can a grounded spherical shell have a charge?
corrected terminology
2d
revised Cosmic inflation and space flatness
edited tags
2d
revised Why are they building eLISA and what implications would it have?
edited tags
Apr
24
comment Utilising Black Holes as a potential energy source
@CuriousOne hahaha, okay, really reaching for content to complain with.
Apr
24
comment Utilising Black Holes as a potential energy source
@NoahP no, that is just assuming that it can convert the gravitational energy to radiation somehow. If you were to assume that the added mass was efficiently fused also, then the energy efficiency would be about $0.7\%$ which is typical of nuclear fusion --- still an order of magnitude less than with a BH.
Apr
24
comment Utilising Black Holes as a potential energy source
@NoahP great question, the only difference is the radius. A typical star has a radius of about $700,000$ km, which is $200,000$ times more than an equivalent mass BH. So the amount of energy available would be $200,000$ times less!
Apr
24
revised Utilising Black Holes as a potential energy source
edited body; edited tags
Apr
24
answered Utilising Black Holes as a potential energy source
Apr
24
comment Utilising Black Holes as a potential energy source
@CuriousOne if a main-sequence star and a black hole are both accreting at Eddington, which will produce more emission? Perhaps you should reconsider why they should be considered in the same way then. And in the same vein, perhaps answers instead of pedantic comments.
Apr
24
revised How does Compton scattering demonstrate particle over wave behavior?
edited tags
Apr
24
comment Black hole gravity vs parent star gravity
Good answer. I think the it should be, "force would be $10^{10} = 10,000,000,000$ times greater". And the difference in force would be $[(3000 + 2)/3000]^2 \approx 0.001$.
Apr
22
revised Will stars disappear from the sky when their particle horizon is outside the event horizon
edited tags
Apr
22
revised Gravitational waves from neutron star - neutron star merger
edited tags
Apr
22
reviewed Reject How much Oxygen is in ζ-phase metallic Oxygen?
Apr
20
comment Based on our current observations, what all prevents a formed black from experiencing a repulsive force to overcome its gravitational force…?
Possible duplicate of Are black holes really singularities?
Apr
19
comment Can I re-wind gravity?
@CuriousOne yeah, that's obviously why I specific non-zero separations, making it integrable.... and obviously why I specified 'finite' so many times...
Apr
19
comment Can I re-wind gravity?
@CuriousOne I don't think that's true. For any N-Body system, there will be some precision which will lead to any arbitrary accuracy at any finite time in the future. Additionally, because particle separations will always be non-zero (at some precision), the problem is integrable (at least in a practical sense). As a "Theoretical" concept, there should be no problem with time-irreversibility with the appropriate deterministic algorithms, and "arbitrary" floating point precision.
Apr
19
comment In a static bounded universe, what happens to particles that hit the edge?
-1, I don't think "Nobody knows... maybe it reflects." is a good, complete or instructive answer; especially with no reference/backing besides analogy for the bounce supposition.