189 reputation
111
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location Armenia
age 21
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Aug 21 at 21:34

Aug
11
awarded  Commentator
Aug
11
comment Is there a reason why a relativistic quantum theory of a single fermion exists, but of a single scalar not?
The problem of negative energies appears in both cases, but as I understand it is not really a problem. The modern interpretation of this negative energy states is that they propagate backwards in time, which are equivalent to forward propagating positive energy states - antiparticles.
Aug
11
asked Is there a reason why a relativistic quantum theory of a single fermion exists, but of a single scalar not?
Jul
26
awarded  Tumbleweed
Jul
19
asked What about the massless vector mode in ADD model?
Jul
15
comment Kaluza Klein theories, dilation field, and dimensional reduction
Can I ask something about this scalar field (dilaton). I read that originally it was just put constant, but I dont see why this is the case. On the other if it has its own dynamics, than how can we fix the radius of extradimension and also wouldnt it affect the other two terms in the action due to its coupling to them? Thanks
Apr
13
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
17
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
18
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
22
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
26
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
27
awarded  Editor
Dec
27
revised How to prove the equivalence of two definitions of the scattering cross section
added 13 characters in body
Dec
27
comment How to prove the equivalence of two definitions of the scattering cross section
It's my fault, I forgot to mention differential. I'll edit it now.
Dec
27
comment How to prove the equivalence of two definitions of the scattering cross section
As much as I know both are called differential cross sections.
Dec
27
asked How to prove the equivalence of two definitions of the scattering cross section
Mar
16
accepted Relation between the determinants of metric tensors
Mar
4
asked Relation between the determinants of metric tensors
Nov
17
comment Are the Maxwell's equations enough to derive the law of Coulomb?
@Daniel Blay: I guess when you say usual tricks you mean taking a spherical surface around the point charge. The problem for me is that how do we know that the magnitude of the electric field from a point charge is spherically-symmetric. Besides how can we derive that there is no magnetic field (if it is possible to derive from Maxwell's equations)? :)