698 reputation
210
bio website
location Waterloo, Canada
age 27
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Sep 16 at 15:19

PhD Student at the Institute for Quantum Computing. Mainly interested in entanglement detection and quantum communication.


Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Apr
5
awarded  Yearling
Apr
1
answered A good book for Quantum Cryptography
Apr
1
answered Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) Upper and Lower Bounds
Mar
7
comment Quantum computing records (entangled qubits)
This is not an answer to either of your four specific questions, but this recent paper arxiv.org/abs/1402.4848 achieved, if I am not mistaken, record single-qubit and two-qubit gate fidelities.
Feb
27
comment What's wrong with this faster-than-light gedankenexperiment?
You're welcome!
Feb
25
answered What's wrong with this faster-than-light gedankenexperiment?
Dec
6
comment Are coherent states of light 'classical' or 'quantum'?
It seems unlikely that the only thing truly quantum about coherent states is that they still obey the uncertainty principle, since this hardly seems to be the feature that is relevant in their application to quantum information processing.
Dec
4
comment Are coherent states of light 'classical' or 'quantum'?
My apologies, I actually didn't look past the title of the paper I linked to. However, I do know that coherent states play a role in many architectures for quantum computing.
Dec
4
revised Are coherent states of light 'classical' or 'quantum'?
added 6 characters in body
Dec
4
asked Are coherent states of light 'classical' or 'quantum'?
Apr
24
comment Question on hadamard gate and cnot gate circuit tables
I am guessing you know the action of a Hadamard gate on the computational basis: H(|0>)=1/sqrt(2)(|0>+|1>) and H(|1>)=1/sqrt(2)(|0>-|1>). What state do you get when you apply a Hadamard to each qubit when the initial state is |00>? To compute the action of the CNOT gate, just use linearity the of quantum mechanics. For example CNOT(|00>+|11>)=CNOT|00>+CNOT|11>.
Apr
11
answered Bell's Theorem graph
Apr
11
comment Bell's Theorem graph
Which of the two questions you pose are you most interested in? Understanding Bell's theorem or randomness in quantum mechanics? It appears that your question is really two questions!
Apr
5
awarded  Yearling
Apr
2
answered Types of photon qubit encoding
Mar
15
awarded  Critic
Mar
15
revised mixture of maximally mixed and maximally entangled state
Corrected some language issues and normalized the maximally entangled state to avoid confusion.
Mar
15
suggested suggested edit on mixture of maximally mixed and maximally entangled state
Mar
15
answered mixture of maximally mixed and maximally entangled state