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Mar
23
comment Why is my restaurant silverware magnetized?
I also heard they might heat the silverware through induction in the dish washer, which magnetizes it. Don't know if that is true, though.
Mar
20
comment What is special about a 126 GeV Higgs mass?
@JohnRennie: I thought about including a "disclaimer", a la: please understand this as within the rules of the site, I'm not looking for guesses and discussion, please explain the vacuum stability issue in more detail, and give formulas for the higgs mass in the MSSM, etc. pp.. But I assumed 1) that was silly as we are all grown up and know the context of the site, and 2) I figured I keep it a bit more open -- If I'd ask directly for e.g. a formula for $m_H$, people might answer literally and I might miss out on important insights.
Mar
20
asked What is special about a 126 GeV Higgs mass?
Mar
12
comment What does library number 539 mean in physics books?
I think it could be really useful to have a physicists.stackechange.com to ask questions that come up in the life of a physicist, but are not directly physics. Alternatively one could think about allowing them on meta.physics.stackexchange.com, which is right now only meta Q&A for the site itself.
Mar
4
accepted Propagator of a scalar in position space
Mar
4
comment Propagator of a scalar in position space
That makes sense, thanks! Is it true that you can go from the massless propagator back to the massive case by summing over intermediate interactions (like in this picture, I haven't found a better source online quickly)?
Mar
4
asked Propagator of a scalar in position space
Feb
28
comment Renormalization and the Hierarchy Problem
@MitchellPorter: I think the argument goes: We expect the SM to break down at the latest at $M_P$, since that's where quantum gravity comes into play. Choose $\Lambda = M_P$ $\Rightarrow$ hierarchy problem $\Rightarrow$ BSM physics (e.g. SUSY). But if you don't go up that far, and say new physics comes already at $M_{BSM} = 1$ TeV, then there is no hierarchy problem (or you solved it, depending on how you look at it), but in any case $\Rightarrow$ BSM physics. Am I right? I've always found this argument oddly circular. (Nevertheless, I'd like to see the reasoning for why exactly M_P too)
Feb
28
comment Renormalization and the Hierarchy Problem
So... I don't understand why people are surprized that choosing a value for Λ implies a hierarchy. I mean you explicitly put in the hierarchy by saying Λ = Mpl... I also don't understand why the bare mass should have a meaningful (measurable) value, since it is not observable... or is it?
Feb
28
comment Renormalization and the Hierarchy Problem
Thanks, the repetition is OK, I'm trying to reaffirm what I basically should know :-). But some confusion remains: I understand, if you insert a finite value for Λ, you have to adjust $m_0$, and get the hierarchy $|m_0| \ll |\delta m|$. But if you leave Λ open, with the intent to let it go to infinity, then $m_0$ must cancel the divergence (not just a large number!). Then $m_0$ is just symbolic, and has no well-defined value of its own. I thought the main purpose of renormalization was eliminating the divergent Λ depencency from the equation! ...
Feb
28
asked Renormalization and the Hierarchy Problem
Feb
25
comment Reference for the renormalization of a scalar field's mass
@Danu: Thanks, that looks helpful.
Feb
25
asked Reference for the renormalization of a scalar field's mass
Feb
19
comment Does a muon detector on Earth's surface correctly measure the mean lifetime of a muon?
Nice question. I supervised a muon decay lab course, and when a student asked me this for the first time, I had a really hard time finding the answer. Now I like to ask my students this question to give them something to think about :-).
Jan
15
comment How to find SUSY with near-degenerate masses?
@annav: Thanks, I forgot to take the random boost of the initial state into account! That could help, even without additional emitted particles. Still, just from experience, there are parameter ranges areas where its not enough and a e.g. multilepton search is just not sensitive.
Jan
15
comment How to find SUSY with near-degenerate masses?
@anna v: True, that's why I wrote comfortably detect. The problem is for one the trigger, you have a minimal $p_T$ threshold to trigger on single electrons or muons, and if it's too low, you have to run prescaled (I think at the moment at ATLAS the lowest is at 10 GeV, and then 18 GeV, but I'm not sure). The other thing is that (assuming your event triggered on something) you don't know the trigger efficiencies very well below 15 or 10 GeV (because they were determined e.g. from $Z\rightarrow\ell\ell$. So very often, you can't use those soft leptons as you'd like.
Jan
15
asked How to find SUSY with near-degenerate masses?
Jan
15
asked How to measure (missing) transverse energy
Jan
6
comment Moving between degenerate vacua?
What I was trying to say was, I think the symmetry breaking only implies that you are anywhere in the circle, not that you are in a certain fixed point. I don't know how you move around in the valley, or if there is a physical meaning to the "angular position" but I'd like to know, too.
Jan
5
comment Moving between degenerate vacua?
I guess you're asking whether the state moves around in the valley, or if it stays fixed ("remains broken" in the same orientation), and if it stays fixed, what keeps it there? ... I'm not sure, so I just leave this as a comment. But I think you can have a different value of the field (position in the valley) at every point in space, and it doesn't matter which one it is, because you can't measure the field directly. What matters is the form of the potential - the position of the minimum gives you the higgs VEV, the curvature (oscillations up the walls) creates the gauge boson masses.