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Jan
15
asked How to find SUSY with near-degenerate masses?
Jan
15
asked How to measure (missing) transverse energy
Jan
6
comment Moving Between Degenerate Vacua?
What I was trying to say was, I think the symmetry breaking only implies that you are anywhere in the circle, not that you are in a certain fixed point. I don't know how you move around in the valley, or if there is a physical meaning to the "angular position" but I'd like to know, too.
Jan
5
comment Moving Between Degenerate Vacua?
I guess you're asking whether the state moves around in the valley, or if it stays fixed ("remains broken" in the same orientation), and if it stays fixed, what keeps it there? ... I'm not sure, so I just leave this as a comment. But I think you can have a different value of the field (position in the valley) at every point in space, and it doesn't matter which one it is, because you can't measure the field directly. What matters is the form of the potential - the position of the minimum gives you the higgs VEV, the curvature (oscillations up the walls) creates the gauge boson masses.
Dec
13
comment String Theory- Are strings the end? What are they made of?
@MBN: I guess they think it's settled that they are made of strings.
Dec
13
awarded  Yearling
Dec
10
reviewed Reviewed The effect of dark lines in the Sun's spectrum on reflected paint/ color
Dec
10
comment What is quark transverse momentum?
Possibly a duplicate of "What is p_T? (transverse momentum?)", does that link answer your question?
Dec
10
comment How to understand exciton?
The radius of the exciton is larger because the eff. mass of the hole is smaller than the proton mass (The Bohr radius is $a_0 = \hbar\,/\,\mathbf{m_e}\, c \,\alpha$). And the difference between the hole and the positron is that the positron is a real particle ($e^+$), whereas the hole is a quasiparticle. It's a collective behavior of the material's electrons that looks like it is a particle.
Dec
10
comment How to understand exciton?
@KabaT: The hole is basically an atom that is missing an electron. But that picture is not quite accurate, since the atom is fixed in the lattice, but the hole moves around. A better picture would be to imagine a hole in the electron cloud that moves around as if it were a particle. Or think of it as an air bubble: When you excite an electon above the gap, you have a "droplet of water" in the upper band, and a "bubble of air" of same volume in the lower band. It is an absense of water, but behaves like a droplet...
Dec
8
awarded  Custodian
Dec
8
reviewed No Action Needed when water falls to the ground and forms a puddle, where does most of the energy go?
Dec
8
answered How to understand exciton?
Dec
8
answered What is anti-time?
Dec
8
comment $D$ and $H$ in macroscopic Maxwell's equation: auxiliary or constitutive?
@HuiZhang right, thanks, fixed it.
Dec
8
revised $D$ and $H$ in macroscopic Maxwell's equation: auxiliary or constitutive?
fixed typo
Dec
8
answered $D$ and $H$ in macroscopic Maxwell's equation: auxiliary or constitutive?
Dec
6
comment Free HEP dataset for teaching and demo purposes?
The Masterclasses are cool, we also offer ATLAS/LHC Masterclasses at our institute. However, its not quite what I'm looking for. The data is highly processed, and it's targeted to high school students as you say. I'm looking for something you could give bachelor/master students, or something you could use to make example plots for a book.
Dec
6
asked Textbook about the handiwork of a HEP analysis?
Dec
6
asked Free HEP dataset for teaching and demo purposes?