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Dec
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
7
answered Frequency of a photon
Dec
1
comment Is the big bang a fact?
"is the big bang actually proven?". Science is different from mathematics: nothing in science is ever "proven". All we can do is to see how well it stacks up against observations - which the big bang does very well, so far.
Nov
30
comment Alternative type energy storage to batteries?
I know you said you do not want to use batteries. However, Sanyo's Eneloop batteries will keep 70% of their charge for 5 years or more. I use them for all my A and AA battery requirements. See panasonic.net/energy/battery/eneloop
Nov
30
comment Alternative type energy storage to batteries?
Large flywheels can store energy for very long periods. Smaller ones will run down proportionally faster, though.
Nov
29
comment Alternative type energy storage to batteries?
I assume your FSM is not the Flying Spaghetti Monster. So, what is it?
Nov
29
answered Alternative type energy storage to batteries?
Nov
28
comment Was Aristotle Actually Correct About Gravitation?
In that case, if you apply a= f/m then the acceleration will be the same for both
Nov
27
comment Was Aristotle Actually Correct About Gravitation?
You missed the fact that the moon has MUCH more mass than the ball of iron. As acceleration = force * mass, the acceleration will be the same for both.
Nov
24
comment Why does objects with zero acceleraton move?
Your mistake is in the sentence "if we apply a force on an object to move it with a constant velocity". If we apply a force (ignoring friction, say in a vacuum), the object willnot move with constant velocity. Instead, it will accelerate. If f=0, then acceleration=0, i.e. speed is constant.
Nov
18
comment Is it possible to create a parachute large enough to stop all velocity?
What would stop the parachute from falling??
Nov
10
comment Falling into the black hole: a picture from the infinite distance
You have the argument back to front. It would take an infinite time for an external observer but, for the point of view of the victim, it would happen in real time. Depending on the size of the BH, he might be spaghettified very rapidly or, in the case of a supermassive BH, he might go right through the event horizon without noticing anything amiss.
Nov
6
comment What is the difference between a neutron and hydrogen?
Thanks for the gobbledygook
Oct
30
comment Construct classical computer using classical light
For another example of how just about anything can be used to construct a NAND gate (and hence a computer), try fluidics: a computer using fluids (water, air, etc). See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluidics
Oct
29
comment Does alternating current come from DC?
@justin Do you mean RMS instead of RMI? RMS is the "average" value of the fluctuating AC current. And if I understand your question correctly then no, the reduction in current does not happen "because of rms". Because power=VxI, you get the same amount of power at, say, double the voltage with half the current. And high voltages are used because halving the current reduces the losses by a factor of 4.
Oct
27
comment Does alternating current come from DC?
@justin. AC does not increase energy. However, when using high voltage you need less current for the same power (power = current x voltage). Less current means less loss (loss = cable_resistance x current x current). With AC it's easy to increase the voltage (just use a transformer); with DC you need advanced electronics. Hence the preference for AC. Ignore the 2nd answer in your yahoo link, it's meaningless; AC does not work that way.
Oct
27
answered Does alternating current come from DC?
Oct
27
answered How many atoms exist within a continuum body?
Oct
6
answered How long does it take for $25~\text{mC}$ to pass a point if the current is $12.5~\text{mA}$?
Sep
16
comment If an asteroid were threatening the Earth, could I deviate it just by jumping on it?
@Carl For a comet of mass 3x10^12 kg (2km diameter) the escape velocity is 0.46 m/s, a slow walking pace. See wired.com/2014/08/comet-walk