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bio website cedrich.net
location Geneva, Switzerland
age 28
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Oct 28 at 0:16

Nov
29
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
26
comment Hubble's law and conservation of energy
@Marek: If one does'nt know about time symmetry, it is almost impossible to consider that just reading your (correct) answer.
Nov
24
comment Rope tension question
OK but a tensor is not a matrix...
Nov
24
comment The Impossibility ( or Possibility) of Solving $N$-Body Problem
@Ngu: strange definition of analyticity.
Nov
23
comment What's with the very slightly larger mass of the neutron compared to the proton?
@Frederic: Yes I would, in a process called $\beta^+$, which is energetically acceptable because it appears in a bound state (a nucleus) and the binding energy has to be considered. I meant that it is incorrect because of the "is": a neutron "is" a proton and an electron, meaning something like a intimately bound state or something like that.
Nov
23
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
21
comment Resonance in a gravitational field?
"Resonance in a gravitational field" makes me thing about that: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbital_resonance . But your question is strangely stated..
Nov
21
comment Gravity and Collision of two continuous mass distributions
@Rajesh: At first your question was not clear at all... I interpreted by "point mass" a geometrical point affected with a mass. A classical scattering problem like the one of a charged point-like particle.
Nov
20
comment Gravity and Collision of two continuous mass distributions
I think you are all going too far with this black hole thing, my opinion is that he is just asking the different between the scattering of point-like particles and the scattering of spheres; this can be treated due to gravitational or electrostatic interactions (if the spheres are charged). No big deal with GR. Unless the question is very very strange ...
Nov
19
comment Wi-Fi in the presence of very strong magnets?
The frequencies at least have to be in a similar range.
Nov
18
comment Can a superconducting wire conduct unlimited current?
"A superconductor also expels all magnetic fields from inside itself (Meissner effect)," This is true only for type I SC or for type II below the first critical field. Usually magnets are type II operating between the critical fields, in that case the field penetrates the material partially.
Nov
18
comment Can a superconducting wire conduct unlimited current?
"A superconducting magnet quench can produce a sizeable explosion!" True but this has nothing to do with superconductivity itself.
Nov
17
answered How relevant is LHC to quantum gravity?
Nov
17
revised How relevant is LHC to quantum gravity?
Tags
Nov
17
comment What makes a space a real space?
When I am talking to my mother I don't use the word "space" and when I am solving a physical problem I formulate it mathematically... What's the difference between your question and "Why would we interpret something that seems to move as something really moving ?" ?
Nov
17
comment What makes a space a real space?
Real space if not a very well defined concept: we just use it when we want to distinguish from another space we are using, like reciprocal space.
Nov
17
revised Amount of 2 amperage
Latex
Nov
17
comment What makes a space a real space?
Please stop with this "philosophy" tag: either your question is a valid question about physics as a science and it doesn't need this tag or this is not a valid question and it should be closed.
Nov
17
comment Is it possible/correct to describe electromagnetism using curved space(-time)?
The answer of Eric is really interesting and correct and explain that in their general form, Maxwell equations can be applied in the case of a curved space-time. But I think the question was: the basic gravitational potential is similar to the electrostatic one, so can we describe electromagnetism using general relativity. As you accepted the answer, you should maybe modify to question to make things clear.