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seen Dec 15 '13 at 13:04

May
27
comment Physical Explanation of Being Able to “Think”
Physics alone will probably never give an explanation of why we are able to think. There is the subdiscipline of neurophysics (i.e. the study/modelling of neurons/neural networks in the brain). There are already semi-realistic models for the behaviour of individual neurons and there are methods of simulating networks of those. This is however a far way from understanding how cognitive functions arise from "similiar" networks in the brain. In other words up to now there is some model of the "hardware" but almost no understanding how those lead to cognitive functions.
May
24
comment How can/does calculus describe the movement of a particle?
@OllyPrice I think Khan Academy is overly verbose, there are many good books on calculus. More important than any resources is that you try to learn actively: I.e. as soon as you think you understood something try it out on lots of examples.
May
22
comment Derivation of the supergravity action in 11D
A counting argument can only give a neccessary condition not a sufficient one. I would be satisfied if there were a theorem that stated, that there is a (unique?) supersymmetric action, without exhibiting it explicitly. Ideally the theorem should give an algorithm to compute the action. This would be the situation one is in the case of General Relativity or Yang-Mills.
May
21
asked Derivation of the supergravity action in 11D
May
21
comment Give a description of M-theory your grandmother can understand
Explain M-Theory to a grandmother, who was a graduate student in theoretical physics after 1980 :).
May
20
answered The Faddeev-Popov Lagrangian
May
19
revised What areas of physics should a mathematician study to understand TQFT?
fixed link
May
18
answered What areas of physics should a mathematician study to understand TQFT?
May
18
comment Where do I start with Non-Euclidean Geometry?
I disagree that a high school student can understand GR in any deep way. Sure you can understand computations for the schwarzschild metric and similiar concrete examples, after being taught how christoffel symbols are to be computed and how one determines geodesics. But being able to perform computations is a long way from actually understanding what they signify.
May
18
comment Where do I start with Non-Euclidean Geometry?
It depends on why you want to learn general relativity. Their book contains a lot of insights, that you won't find in any other book. It would probably help to read it concurrently to a lecture or lecture notes. To get an idea what the bare essentials are.
May
18
revised Where do I start with Non-Euclidean Geometry?
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May
18
answered Where do I start with Non-Euclidean Geometry?
May
18
comment Is anti-matter matter going backwards in time?
@RonMaimon Do you know of a good source, where the analytic structure of the amplitudes is discussed?
May
16
comment Why not using Lagrangian, instead of Hamiltonian, in non relativistic QM?
@RonMaimon There is a path integral formulation of the Hamiltonian formalism. It is equivalent to the usual formulation for theories quadratic in the momenta.
May
14
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
12
revised How does the string worldsheet affect the space-time in which they live?
added 152 characters in body
May
12
answered How does the string worldsheet affect the space-time in which they live?
May
6
awarded  Commentator
May
6
comment Why does work equal force times distance?
@RonMaimon: Well, ok but what is Force? Mathematically it is a one form, you tell me what direction you want to move in and I tell you what force you are experiencing. In standard physics courses forces are of course drawn as vectors, but if you think about it, the direction of the force and the magnitude are really separate. What actually happens is: You or something else decides on a direction and then you get back the magnitude of force in that direction. One forms are naturally integrated along paths.
May
6
revised Is the converse of Noether's first theorem true: Every conservation law has a symmetry?
added 3 characters in body