4,577 reputation
1432
bio website black-holes.org
location Ithaca, NY
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen 4 hours ago

I am a theoretical astrophysicist working mostly in relativity.


Apr
17
comment Would we see the past if we look to a mirror 1 light year away?
possible duplicate of Will we ever be able to view the past?
Apr
17
revised Why is the “real” gauge group of the standard model $SU(3) \times SU(2) \times U(1) /N$?
added 543 characters in body
Apr
16
answered Why is the “real” gauge group of the standard model $SU(3) \times SU(2) \times U(1) /N$?
Apr
12
answered Books that develop interest & critical thinking among high school students
Apr
11
reviewed Edit Is there no electric field inside a conductor?
Apr
11
revised Is there no electric field inside a conductor?
Fixed title, grammar, tags
Apr
11
reviewed Approve What happens to the nucleus energy when it decays?
Apr
8
revised A Theorem Due to Hodge: Hawking/Ellis
added 86 characters in body
Apr
7
revised A Theorem Due to Hodge: Hawking/Ellis
added 369 characters in body
Apr
5
revised A Theorem Due to Hodge: Hawking/Ellis
added 84 characters in body
Apr
5
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
5
revised A Theorem Due to Hodge: Hawking/Ellis
added 1130 characters in body
Apr
5
awarded  Revival
Apr
5
answered A Theorem Due to Hodge: Hawking/Ellis
Mar
30
comment $\nabla^{\mu}\nabla_{\mu}$ in general relativity
(I'm guessing $\phi$ has no angular dependence...) Ignore the time part, and pretend $B(r)=1$. Then, you've got the standard spatial metric in spherical coordinates. So you should get something like the standard Laplacian in spherical coordinates, which has that $2$. Looks like you screwed something up in calculating the Christoffel symbols.
Mar
26
awarded  Custodian
Mar
26
reviewed Leave Closed How to use the Born rule to find the expected outcome of this simple Stern-Gerlach experiment
Mar
26
reviewed Leave Closed Constant part of a photo taken
Mar
26
reviewed Reopen Hartree-Fock: Coulomb integral
Mar
23
comment Is the total mass of Earth's atmosphere essentially constant in time?
I don't think I get your point. The Oxygen isn't lost; it's converted chemically, but its mass and position are essentially unchanged. As I pointed out above, the mass increase due to Carbon alone is roughly 1/4 of the mass increase of $\mathrm{CO}_2$, and that's the number I used. Also, the number I cited accounted for reabsorption in the oceans and biomass. Without the Carbon, instead of ocean acidification, you still get ocean oxygenation. So I don't see how it would change the mass balance significantly.