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seen Nov 1 '13 at 18:16

Mar
13
comment When should we use the concept of Impulse/Momentum instead of Force?
"Lets say you have a pulley system. A simple one: A person A is hanging from one end," I enjoyed reading the answer, until I read this peace of horror, specially that it's complemented with "and a block B of equal mass is on the other end.". Good, the person is dead in equilibrium.
Mar
13
comment When should we use the concept of Impulse/Momentum instead of Force?
but we can't find velocity without time, so I guess we need to know time anyway (if we could find time and velocity, we can find acceleration also.)
Mar
1
comment Question about interaction between three objects
I have added my attempt David. Please open the question.
Mar
1
comment Can we determine the force an object exerts by its mass and acceleration?
I understand it's Newton's third law, but I thought that object B doesn't necessarily only exert the force object A is exerting on it. I can intuitively understand it has to be the only force, but how would I know using Newton's Laws? I mean, how did you conclude that the net force object X gets, is equal to the net force it exerts?
Feb
29
comment Can we determine the force an object exerts by its mass and acceleration?
"If you are able to determine that object A is only subject to one force, then you can find that one force because you know it's equal to the total force. But that's the only case in which the mass and acceleration tell you about a specific force." Yes, I can find that one force that is being exerted on the object, but does that mean that the object has (or exerts) that amount of force? If yes, can you tell me how that is?
Feb
27
comment Example in the book: A simple accelerometer
I understand there is force, but there could be multiple forces, and the force of the string (horizontally) doesn't have to be equal to the force of the car (horizontally), since they are not an action-reaction pair.
Feb
27
comment Example in the book: A simple accelerometer
What type of force is it?