3,021 reputation
726
bio website
location
age 68
visits member for 4 years
seen Jan 10 '12 at 15:28

Apr
4
comment Why does the air we blow/exhale out from our mouths change from hot to cold depending on the size of the opening we make with our mouth?
Cool experiment for kids, wet thermometers, dry thermometers, blowing different ways, etc.
Apr
4
comment In quantum mechanics, why do the probabilities of the possible outcomes of a measurement add up to 1?
Sorry, ran out of space. My basic criticism is that there is way too much theory in your definition of the "outcome" of an experiment. As an experimentalist, to me, the outcome is whatever comes out, which can more or less be anything. Your question has to do more with the rescalings of probabilities which occur all the time in real experiments, as you indicated. So to me you want to know whether there could be theories which always predict missing probability of detection, like missing energy or spin before neutrinos were discovered? But wouldn't we just call that particle decay?
Apr
4
comment In quantum mechanics, why do the probabilities of the possible outcomes of a measurement add up to 1?
Do this first with ants, in a Y shaped maze with cameras as detectors. There is the possibility that the ant a) "gets reflected", i.e. turns around, or b) "gets absorbed" in the apparatus, i.e. stops or gets eaten by a spider. To you both of these are "no outcome" results. Similarly, for atoms in a Stern-Gerlach apparatus, there can be poor beam focusing, or poor vacuum, etc. However, to me, in both these circumstances, there was indeed an outcome, namely that neither detector registers an ant or an atom (in the delta t assumed). Another outcome is that both detectors could register.
Apr
3
comment In quantum mechanics, why do the probabilities of the possible outcomes of a measurement add up to 1?
@Koantum, your definition seems circular. I am asking, operationally, i.e. in terms of apparati we can really build or actions we can macroscopically do, what could "no outcome" actually be. Please see my extended answer below
Apr
3
answered In quantum mechanics, why do the probabilities of the possible outcomes of a measurement add up to 1?
Apr
3
comment In quantum mechanics, why do the probabilities of the possible outcomes of a measurement add up to 1?
What could you possibly mean by "no outcome"? The experimenter is transported backwards in time and the experiment never happened? I think this is what Vladimir was alluding to above. At any rate try to define "no outcome"
Mar
20
revised Young's experiment or why the light can't be described as a particle
added 209 characters in body; added 1 characters in body
Mar
20
revised Young's experiment or why the light can't be described as a particle
added 80 characters in body; added 67 characters in body
Mar
20
revised Young's experiment or why the light can't be described as a particle
added 1205 characters in body
Mar
19
answered Why is air invisible?
Mar
19
answered Young's experiment or why the light can't be described as a particle
Mar
6
comment What's a better phrase than “speed of light” for the universal spacetime speed constant?
I call it the maximal velocity of any physically causal interaction. One could also say the maximal physical speed of transmission of any sort of information. Is this what you were asking for?
Mar
4
revised What is the world's biggest Schrodinger cat?
added 84 characters in body; added 1 characters in body; added 88 characters in body
Mar
4
answered What is the world's biggest Schrodinger cat?
Feb
26
revised Why is cold fusion considered bogus?
added 2 characters in body
Feb
26
revised Why is cold fusion considered bogus?
added 129 characters in body; added 1 characters in body
Feb
20
answered The speed of gravity?
Feb
14
answered Example of a time varying function which can be easily measured
Feb
14
comment Example of a time varying function which can be easily measured
Watch out not to use a medical thermometer; it will break. Maybe an oven thermometer. Or could use a different temperature range, e.g. from 100 deg. F to room temp., i.e. letting it cool in different shaped vessels
Feb
12
comment Can Noether's theorem be understood intuitively?
Well, Vladimir's question/answer is now clearer to me. He apparently wants to know the relationship between Noether's therem and what Landau calls additive, conserved quantities. Relating it back to the original question, what parts of Noether's Thm. imply that the resultant integrals of motion are additive? This obviously relates to the intuitive understanding of the theorem and its interpretation, assuming the above is true.