3,029 reputation
727
bio website
location
age 68
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Jan 10 '12 at 15:28

Dec
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
2
awarded  Yearling
Oct
2
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Mar
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
2
awarded  Yearling
Oct
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
25
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
29
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
2
awarded  Yearling
Oct
23
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Jan
5
awarded  Taxonomist
Nov
2
awarded  Yearling
Oct
3
comment Is it true that quantum mechanics technically allows anything to happen?
You know, to me this is actually an interesting question, which it will take some precision and subtlety to discuss properly. As an aside, what is the level of education of the questioner, and his/her friends? I have known a least one biology Nobel Laureate who disagreed with me about this. A way of restating the question might be, "Are all quantum mechanical propositions necessarily probabilistic?" Lederberg said yes. I very much appreciate the comment below, that events with 0 measure could also actually happen.
Sep
10
comment Why are the antimatter compositions of neutrons and protons different? Why by about 1%? References?
I assume that as well as gluons, a considerable amount is also carried as kinetic energy of the various particles. I would accept these two answers, but would like to first ask some "ab initio" people for their results, which may be better because of all the nonlinearities at the low quark energies involved. By the way, how low is that in nuclear matter at rest?