1,965 reputation
1827
bio website
location Mezőkövesd, Hungary
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen yesterday

I mostly self learn Physics, I don't have a degree.

I have a good grasp on:

  • physics we learned at high school.
  • A-level physics topics.
  • Special relativity.
  • Maxwell equations.

Topics I get the idea but still struggle with the mathematics:

  • General relativity. (have a good grasp on the Riemann curvature tensor, but yet to get a good intuitive grasp the Ricci tensor and stress-energy tensor).
  • Quantum mechanics. (I tend to stick to wave-functions with or without asterisk and operators, the asymmetric braket notation still look too alien to me.)

Topic I barely scratched the surface on:

  • Quantum field theory. (I think I got the idea of the Fock space and the annihilation and creation operators, but still need a lot of work understand how and why it works.)

Jul
27
comment Why do semiconductors remain neutral outside the depletion region?
@JonCuster Can you explain it?
Jul
26
answered Why do semiconductors remain neutral outside the depletion region?
Jul
26
comment Why do semiconductors remain neutral outside the depletion region?
@JonCuster the question is not about why does the charge transfer between the pieces stop. The question is. when the pieces are in equilibrium why don't the remaining charge carriers distribute themselves uniformly in each half. Why there aren't any electric field? The + ions are a little closer than the - ions so there should be a little net force from + charges. Or let's see another example: you ground the negative end of a 9V battery and connect the other into piece of semiconductor, will the whole piece charge up to 9V or it only does that right next to the battery only like an insulator?
Jul
25
asked Why do semiconductors remain neutral outside the depletion region?
Jul
24
awarded  Good Question
Jul
18
comment What does Fermi level in the band gap mean?
From this answer it's still not clear to me why would the fermi level lie in a forbidden gap. Based on what I have found on the internet they say fermi level is the maximum energy level occupied by electrons on 0K "the top of the Fermi sea". For semiconductors this mean all electrons are in the valence band. So why don't the fermi level lies right at the top of the valence band instead? It's not clear to me.
Jul
17
comment Why does noble gas electron configuration have low energy?
Why didn't answer the main point of the question: why does the noble gas electron configuration have lower energy than other non-noble configurations?
Jul
17
asked Why does noble gas electron configuration have low energy?
Jul
3
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
2
awarded  Famous Question
Jun
11
comment Does an electron beam always repel electrons outside the beam?
@CuriousOne Nope. Would it be faster than light?
Jun
11
asked Does an electron beam always repel electrons outside the beam?
Jun
6
comment What is the highest possible space dive free fall?
The main problem is with the deceleration. Not the burn up, arriving vertically you would need to stop from 11km/s in seconds which is a huge deceleration which might break your body up.
Jun
5
asked Does frequently switching a compact fluorescent lamp on and off reduce its lifespan?
Jun
4
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
4
asked Is simultaneity well defined in general relativity?
Jun
4
revised Does gravitational pull depend on the velocity of movement?
deleted 63 characters in body
Jun
4
comment Does gravitational pull depend on the velocity of movement?
@JohnRennie Maybe coordinate time expression is better afterall. Imagine you are distant observer looking the black hole at the galactic center and you set some polar coordinate system around this black hole, and you plot the star positions around it. And based on the data you also have the coordiante velocity and coordinate acceleration. The question is: Is the observed acceleration depend on the observed velocity? But based on that Wikipedia article you linked it seems that's exactly the case.
Jun
4
comment Does gravitational pull depend on the velocity of movement?
@JohnRennie Okay, replaced $t$ with $\tau$.
Jun
4
revised Does gravitational pull depend on the velocity of movement?
added 9 characters in body