1,942 reputation
1727
bio website
location Mezőkövesd, Hungary
age 26
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Jul 2 at 16:02

I mostly self learn Physics, I don't have a degree.

I have a good grasp on:

  • physics we learned at high school.
  • A-level physics topics.
  • Special relativity.
  • Maxwell equations.

Topics I get the idea but still struggle with the mathematics:

  • General relativity. (have a good grasp on the Riemann curvature tensor, but yet to get a good intuitive grasp the Ricci tensor and stress-energy tensor).
  • Quantum mechanics. (I tend to stick to wave-functions with or without asterisk and operators, the asymmetric braket notation still look too alien to me.)

Topic I barely scratched the surface on:

  • Quantum field theory. (I think I got the idea of the Fock space and the annihilation and creation operators, but still need a lot of work understand how and why it works.)

Jul
3
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
2
awarded  Famous Question
Jun
11
comment Does an electron beam always repel electrons outside the beam?
@CuriousOne Nope. Would it be faster than light?
Jun
11
asked Does an electron beam always repel electrons outside the beam?
Jun
6
comment What is the highest possible space dive free fall?
The main problem is with the deceleration. Not the burn up, arriving vertically you would need to stop from 11km/s in seconds which is a huge deceleration which might break your body up.
Jun
5
asked Does frequently switching a compact fluorescent lamp on and off reduce its lifespan?
Jun
4
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
4
asked Is simultaneity well defined in general relativity?
Jun
4
revised Does gravitational pull depend on the velocity of movement?
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Jun
4
comment Does gravitational pull depend on the velocity of movement?
@JohnRennie Maybe coordinate time expression is better afterall. Imagine you are distant observer looking the black hole at the galactic center and you set some polar coordinate system around this black hole, and you plot the star positions around it. And based on the data you also have the coordiante velocity and coordinate acceleration. The question is: Is the observed acceleration depend on the observed velocity? But based on that Wikipedia article you linked it seems that's exactly the case.
Jun
4
comment Does gravitational pull depend on the velocity of movement?
@JohnRennie Okay, replaced $t$ with $\tau$.
Jun
4
revised Does gravitational pull depend on the velocity of movement?
added 9 characters in body
Jun
4
comment Does gravitational pull depend on the velocity of movement?
@AcidJazz There is no "relativistic mass" in GR. Also only the space-time curvature depends on the masses of the bodies making it, but the test particles with negligble masses "riding" it won't affect it.
Jun
4
asked Does gravitational pull depend on the velocity of movement?
May
15
comment Intuitive understanding of the elements in the stress-energy tensor
Isn't $\gamma m c^2$ the total energy? I knew the rest energy is only $mc^2$.
May
14
comment Correlation between entangled photon polarisation measurement?
@Joseph Search for 'quantum malus law'. Basically it's the same as the classical one. But instead of relating the intensity of light beams, it tells the chance whether a photon with a given angle pass or fail the polarizer.
May
14
revised Intuitive understanding of the elements in the stress-energy tensor
added 234 characters in body
May
14
asked Intuitive understanding of the elements in the stress-energy tensor
May
14
answered Correlation between entangled photon polarisation measurement?
May
12
comment Why two different Lagrangians to derive geodesic equations?
Do you really want to derive geodesic equation with Lagrangians? I think it's simpler if you derive and practice differential geometric concepts in simple sphere. You should first understand the covariant derivative; when it's zero you defined parallel transport; when you parallel transport a vector towards the direction in points to, you'll follow a geodesic and that yields the geodesic equation, quite intuitively. Basically the equation says how do you need to change the coordinates of your velocity vector to remain on a straight path.