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Nov
19
comment Does the pilot of a rocket ship experience an asymptotic approach to the speed of light?
Ah yes, sorry you are right at this point. But don't think this is what was asked.
Nov
19
comment Does the pilot of a rocket ship experience an asymptotic approach to the speed of light?
Hint: don't jump from one reference frame to another unexpectedly. First select most simple reference frame, then calculate task it it, then transform to another reference frame correctly. The fact is: in principle, pilot can reach Alpha Centauri for one second of personal time. This means, that his impression can be that he moved at a speed of 4 ly per second -- much faster than light. But this is not what is regarded as physical speed.
Nov
19
comment Does the pilot of a rocket ship experience an asymptotic approach to the speed of light?
@dmckee P.S. I am aware of relativity
Nov
19
comment Does the pilot of a rocket ship experience an asymptotic approach to the speed of light?
There would be no velocity summing by Universe. From the point of view of pilot, he will be stationary. But he will feel G-force. Assuming it is 10m/s^2, pilot can sum this value each second and at some time will get a value greater than C.
Nov
19
comment Does the pilot of a rocket ship experience an asymptotic approach to the speed of light?
Your plot describes situation from the point of view of stationary observer. The question as I understood it, asks about the impressions of a pilot. Pilot will feel $g=9.8\approx10 m/s^2$ all the time. This implies, that after 300000000/10/60/60/24 = 347 days he will come to conclusion, that he is superluminal. Of course he will be wrong, but the question is about impressions.
Nov
19
comment Does the pilot of a rocket ship experience an asymptotic approach to the speed of light?
What to calculate? What are you doubt in? That summing of 10 will supersede 300000000 after some number of operations?
Nov
19
revised Does the pilot of a rocket ship experience an asymptotic approach to the speed of light?
added 7 characters in body
Nov
19
answered What is weak interaction? I need easy and short answer
Nov
19
answered Comparing effect of electric and magnetic dipoles on their fields
Nov
19
answered Creating a 2d magnet simulator
Nov
19
answered Does the pilot of a rocket ship experience an asymptotic approach to the speed of light?
Nov
19
answered Anti-matter as matter going backwards in time? (requesting further clarification upon a previous post)
Nov
19
answered Possibility for contact lenses that enhance the vibrancy of color
Nov
10
asked Does anti-lock braking system (ABS) perform reverse rotation sometimes?
Nov
10
accepted Why aren't betavoltaics and alphavoltaics batteries widely used?
Nov
9
revised Why aren't betavoltaics and alphavoltaics batteries widely used?
added 23 characters in body
Nov
9
comment Why aren't betavoltaics and alphavoltaics batteries widely used?
See my update. I can't agree with points 1-4. (1) it can be invented something. For example one can drain excess power during initial tima (2) power dencity of Ni-63 is not low (3) semiconductors are not obliged (4) no gamma decay in Ni-63; 5,6 looks solveable
Nov
9
revised Why aren't betavoltaics and alphavoltaics batteries widely used?
added 1106 characters in body
Nov
9
awarded  Commentator
Nov
9
comment Why aren't betavoltaics and alphavoltaics batteries widely used?
@lionelbrits I saw power values. But they use small tubes of gaseous tritium. Not strange that it produces small amounts of electrons. If we take solid material with more density -- we will get more. You wish to say that any beta emitter has low prodution?