12,580 reputation
42974
bio website inpursuitoflaziness.blogspot.…
location Mumbai, India
age 20
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen 3 hours ago

I am an engineering physics student who loves the sciences.

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Feb
8
comment What is the most efficient way to use hand dryer?
Of course, if you are talking about energy efficient , then its a moot point as most bathroom hand dryers stay on for a while after you finish (or turn off too early, in which canse you have to turn them on again).
Feb
8
comment Superfields and the Inconsistency of regularization by dimensional reduction
@Simon Maybe the people at enwp.org/WP:RDS could solve it? I'd ask it there myself, but I don't know the topic behind the question.
Feb
8
comment How can a human eye focus on a screen directly in front of it?
But the second approach (thin refractive layer) should work anyways, for both types of pixel elements. It will make the pixel's angular spread look as if it is coming from farther away. We only need a few centimeter's shift (stare at an LCD screen on low brightness from different distances); so we can get re-originate the angular spread without making the screen look too far away.
Feb
8
comment How can a human eye focus on a screen directly in front of it?
Well, yes. But angular spread will have to be minimized in any approach. It's pretty much a given that the pixel elements are not going to be conventional here. The OPs question was more related to focusing the light, so I didn't go into the details of crafting a laserlike pixel (Most probably it will involve polarizers and/or tiny mirrors). I'll add a little note.
Feb
8
comment How can a human eye focus on a screen directly in front of it?
Agreed, your method of putting two lenses seems like less effort. In that case we would just need to carve a thin slab in such a way the the front half (closest to your eyes) is a diverging lens.
Feb
8
comment How can a human eye focus on a screen directly in front of it?
@KrisVanBael Umm, how? The main issue is to make the rays appear to come from somewhere else. (Your answer agrees with that). Arranging the pixel-generating elements in a framework in which they are tilted should do the job. Or using some kind of lens. What type lens exactly I don't know, would require a bit of calculation. It needs to be diverging for parallel, non-paraxial rays, and should have little or no effect on paraxial rays. Lenses can be made unnoticeably thin (Fresnel lenses can be made both thin and flexible).
Feb
8
comment x-ray interaction with atmosphere
Whereas the xray is inevitably absorbed, as its wavelength is smaller than an atom. So it is not spread out enough to have the choice. Aside from this, xrays have a greater tendency to be absorbed by atoms as they are ionizing radiation. Radio waved do not have enough energy to make changes to an atom, so these pass through. (This also comes from the quantized nature of light. Sending a lots of radio wave-photons is not the same as sending an xray-photon)
Feb
8
comment x-ray interaction with atmosphere
The main point is, this analogy only goes so far. What actually happens comes from quantum mechanics. Light is both a particle and a wave, and has a quantum wavefunction. This wavefunction is a probability function of where the light "particle" (photon) can be, and has the same wavelength as the light. Thus, it is more spread out. If such a spread out wave comes across some atoms, it simultaneously passes between the gaps of the atoms, as well as being absorbed by the atoms (sounds weird, but it's due to quantum mechanics). So it has a probability of being absorbed.
Feb
8
comment x-ray interaction with atmosphere
Ah. Here you are confusing momentum with the wavelength. Unfortunately, in my analogy, I have chosen projectiles of whose momentum is directly proportional to their size, whereas for EM waves, $p\propto\frac{1}{\lambda}$. Here, the wall is infinitely large. Now it is note dependant so much on the size of the projectile as it is dependent on the mass. If you want, replace the marble with an extremely dense lead pellet; replace the soccer ball with an ice ball, and replace the truck with a huge softball.
Feb
7
comment How can a human eye focus on a screen directly in front of it?
Being Google, they probably use some other esoteric principle of light that neither of us has thought about. I suspect polarization comes into the picture.
Feb
7
comment x-ray interaction with atmosphere
By this approach, xrays and higher should have the same penetrating power, though we know that penetrating power varies smoothly as frequency. Comments?
Feb
7
comment How can a human eye focus on a screen directly in front of it?
As for the thin layer, I explicitly kept 'short distances' for that reason. And it shouldnt be hard to design one, as it is lenses behave drastically different for nonparaxial rays..
Feb
7
comment How can a human eye focus on a screen directly in front of it?
Tilting the pixels wont do anything to normal vision, the pixels are transparent anyways. Note that the glasses are not tilted; the pixel-generatimg elements are.
Feb
7
comment What does Peter Parkers formula represent?
And on one side some thermo eqns. And the oxidation of glucose. The unboxed stuff is probably just random stuff they picked up from here and there.
Feb
7
comment What does Peter Parkers formula represent?
Its most probably something to do with probability.
Feb
7
comment What does Peter Parkers formula represent?
The text around the box suggests biology(cytokine, cells, etc), but that may be unrelated to the boxed content..
Feb
7
comment How does compression of carbon atoms work?
One thing: graphite is anisotropic, so all properties depend upon orientation. Compressing it in one direction Is relatively easy as compared to another.
Feb
7
comment Easy to understand equivalents for energy (kilowatt-hour)
Chart here absak.com/library/power-consumption-table
Feb
7
comment Do Maxwell's Equations overdetermine the electric and magnetic fields?
You can write in TeX by enclosing the texcode with dollar signs (inline), or double dollars.
Feb
7
comment How equivalent are heat energy and work energy in connection with a spinning flywheel?
I think he's saying that he is giving the flywheel a $v_cm$, thus increasing its energy. As energy $\propto$ mass, the mass has increased, and thus the moment of inertia has increased. So $\omega$ decreases. That's the OP's logic (I think) The main issue here is, how does one deal with rotational kinetic energy in relativity? I'm not too sure of this, so I'm not answering this one.