13,416 reputation
43179
bio website manishearth.github.io
location Mumbai, India
age 21
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen 5 hours ago

I am an engineering student who loves the sciences, especially physics.

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May
4
comment Is Uranium renewable, or will this science fiction scenario become reality?
@RonMaimon: Breeder reactors still don't count as renewable, since you have widened the resource base but all the resources are still renewable.
May
4
comment Will a stone thrown in space move forever?
Technically space isn't a perfect vacuum.. There's a bit of gases and dust and whatnot even in the empty regions. So, after an extremely long time, it will stop. Though before then it is more likely it encounters a gravity-laced region or something; we don't have any sufficiently large empty regions.
May
4
comment Dissipation when the temperature is not constant
@DavidZaslavsky: we generally don't migrate to beta sites unless the question is wholly inappropriate here Will keep in mind, thanks :) $$%newline%$$ @nathaniel I'd like to add that you should cross-link the posts (with > [Cross posted from/to xyz.SE](link) or > [Related: xyz.SE](link))
May
4
comment Dissipation when the temperature is not constant
Flag it (for ♦ moderator attention) if you want a migration. Anyway, I already did that :)
May
3
comment Dissipation when the temperature is not constant
#account check your spam folder, if its not there then file a bugreport on MSO #crosspost: only if ypu can make the two questions distinct meta.stackexchange.com/questions/71938/… Otherwise, we can migrate.. On Phy.SE we have more activity, but less users who know this stuff. On chem, less overall activity but more users who can answer thia. So the better site(for getting an answer) is debatable. I say the post is a better fit on chem, but maybe not its ability to get an answer quickly.
May
3
comment Dissipation when the temperature is not constant
I wonder if crossposting to a private beta is allowed.. Chem.SE would like this 'un, but you don't have an account there. I can do it, but I don't know if it's allowed..
May
3
comment What's the right way to calculate charge on a capacitor?
@jak get a textbook (I suggest Resnick) and revise this topic along with its foundation topics. Also check out online sources like Khan Academy or MIT OCW.
May
3
comment How do you weigh a box on a scale whose limit is too low?
The title of the question made me want to answer "so go on a diet!" ;-)
May
3
comment In a circular pendulum, where does the equation $v=\sqrt{rg\tan{\alpha}}$ come from?
@Garmen1778: It falls under the [homework] tag, regardless of it being homework. See the link above.
May
3
revised In a circular pendulum, where does the equation $v=\sqrt{rg\tan{\alpha}}$ come from?
rolled back to a previous revision
May
3
comment In a circular pendulum, where does the equation $v=\sqrt{rg\tan{\alpha}}$ come from?
Do NOT give full solutions to [homework] problems. Only hints. See meta.physics.stackexchange.com/questions/714/…
May
3
comment Capacitors in series
@jak the E field isn't zero.. If you have opposing charges, then they reinforce not cancel each other--they are on opposite sides and E is a vector. Put a negative charge in between and note that both plates pull/push it in the same direction.
May
3
answered In a circular pendulum, where does the equation $v=\sqrt{rg\tan{\alpha}}$ come from?
May
3
answered Capacitors in series
May
2
comment Why do you get electric field of a light wave?
@Nic yep, thanks :)
May
2
revised Why do you get electric field of a light wave?
deleted 8 characters in body
May
2
comment Why do you get electric field of a light wave?
@John, we do have differ emt interpretations.. I thought he wanted to calculate the constants given the params of the wave. Your interpretation seems to be more correct :)
May
2
comment Why do you get electric field of a light wave?
@John really? It can't be the intensity, since you can adjust E and B to your needs as long as the total energy is the same. Not sure of this, see my answer:/
May
2
comment Why do you get electric field of a light wave?
unfortunately, yes, since it still doesn't determine $A$. Unless I've misinterpreted the question--which I now think I have :/ . I thought the OP wanted the relation between a given light wave and the equation. +1 then :)
May
2
comment Why do you get electric field of a light wave?
Hmm, but doesn't the amplitude factor out and get cancelled here?