25,939 reputation
358123
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location Baltimore, MD
age 29
visits member for 4 years
seen 5 hours ago

I'm a physics graduate student.


Feb
5
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Non-Locality of Space - QFT (Srednicki's book)
Feb
5
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Why am I not burned by a strong wind?
Feb
2
revised Why am I not burned by a strong wind?
I wasn't saying air is N2 and O2. I was referring specifically to the N2 and O2 in the air. Other constituents have different speeds, so I was singling those out.
Feb
2
awarded  Guru
Feb
2
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
2
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Why am I not burned by a strong wind?
Feb
2
comment Why am I not burned by a strong wind?
@Anixx As the answer states, I am referring to energy density, not velocity.
Feb
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
1
answered Why am I not burned by a strong wind?
Feb
1
comment Why am I not burned by a strong wind?
I was in the process of writing an answer when this question was closed. I would like the question re-opened because I find it extremely unlikely that the OP will understand the linked question to be equivalent, and also because my answer takes a considerably different tack than it would when answering the linked question.
Feb
1
revised How long does an object experience motionlessness at the beginning of its descent?
edited title
Feb
1
revised How long does an object experience motionlessness at the beginning of its descent?
edited title
Feb
1
comment Is thermodynamic reversibility a function of path?
@joshphysics good link. I updated the answer.
Feb
1
comment Is thermodynamic reversibility a function of path?
@Christoph Good point. I updated the answer.
Feb
1
revised Is thermodynamic reversibility a function of path?
added 266 characters in body
Feb
1
awarded  Disciplined
Jan
31
answered Is thermodynamic reversibility a function of path?
Jan
29
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
28
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
27
comment Why and how is the speed of light in vacuum constant, i.e., independent of reference frame?
@JerrySchirmer To be honest I was describing physics that was beyond me. I simply remembered reading this in Feynman's QED. Looking it up, on pp 89 it says "The major contribution occurs at the conventional speed of light... but there is also an amplitude for light to go faster (or slower) than the conventional speed of light. You found out that in the last lecture that light doesn't go only in straight lines; now, you find out that it doesn't go only at the speed of light!" Maybe I misunderstand just what this means, though. I don't know quantum field theory.