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Jan
28
comment Signal-to-noise ratio of the difference between two signals
From this, and using Henden's formula, I can obtain the error in magnitudes: $-2.5 \log {1\pm\frac{1}{300}} = 0.0036$. Hopefully I'm not wrong when I consider this error (in Henden's words) to be our noise component. It is at this point where I'm stuck. In order to use your formula, would the signal, $S_1^2$, be still 8.02?
Jan
28
comment Signal-to-noise ratio of the difference between two signals
Thanks a whole lot, twistor59. Although your answer is exactly what I had been looking for, I am not quite sure how it could be applied in our case. I have updated my question in order to include the formula that we use, given the SNR, to compute the error in magnitudes. The thing is that our data set does not distinguishes between signal and noise components — we have a magnitude, say 8.02, and an reliable estimation of its SNR, say 300. [Continues in next comment]