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seen Oct 15 at 20:07

Jun
14
answered How can I find the motion equations of the 2-dim harmonic oscillator?
Jun
14
comment Is the graviton hypothetical?
@Anixx: In a theory where there are no gravitons, gravitational waves will certainly not be composed of them. If there could also be theories where there are gravitons but gravitational waves are not composed of them, I don't know.
Jun
14
answered Is the graviton hypothetical?
May
17
revised Quantum Mechanics - Observable
terminology correction: average value → expectation value
May
17
comment Atomic nucleus consisting of only neutrons?
@ashpool: See my edit
May
17
revised Atomic nucleus consisting of only neutrons?
added information about higher mass number
May
17
answered Atomic nucleus consisting of only neutrons?
May
17
answered Quantum Mechanics - Observable
May
5
comment Finding current in a sphere while given a changing current density
A sphere has a constant radius $R$, therefore you don't have to integrate over that. OTOH, your integral is missing $\phi$. And BTW, your integrals get much more readable if you prefix each $d$ with a thin space which you get using \,.
May
5
answered Evaluating position vector between 2 hydrogen states
May
4
comment Superluminal neutrinos
Actually the impossibility of FTL neutrinos is quite different from the impossibility of tunnelling through a brick wall. Tunnelling through a brick wall wouldn't actually violate any known law of physics, it's just sufficiently improbable according to those laws that if we ever observed it, we'd consider it more likely that our theories have to be amended than that we just have observed such an unlikely event. As such, it is comparable to an object spontaneously heating up in a cold environment. FTL OTOH is not just extremely improbable, but forbidden by the currently known laws of physics.
May
4
comment Superluminal neutrinos
Indeed, they didn't report "we found superluminal neutrinos" but "we measured data that looks like superluminal neutrinos, but after searching for quite some time still cannot find an error in the experiment, so we now decided to publish so that others can check if we have possibly a real effect; we keep searching for an error anyways." How more honest can you be? (I'm a theorist, BTW; you do not have to be an experimentalist to acknowledge that.)
May
4
answered How do we know quantum entanglement exists/happens?
May
1
revised Show that two families of curves are orthogonal (without using orthogonal trajectories)
fixed two index mistakes
May
1
comment Show that two families of curves are orthogonal (without using orthogonal trajectories)
@user3321289: The mathematical field which treats such questions is called differential geometry.
May
1
answered Show that two families of curves are orthogonal (without using orthogonal trajectories)
May
1
answered Double slit experiment observation
May
1
revised are sub-atomic particles really particles or mere concepts in our minds?
edited body
May
1
answered are sub-atomic particles really particles or mere concepts in our minds?
Apr
28
comment Foundations of the notion of elementary particle in the Standard Model
I don't think it gives a mathematical reason, but for that I don't know enough about the standard model (otherwise I would have answered instead of commenting). My point is that the additional particles listed on the Wikipedia page are explicitly no standard model particles.