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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Apr 13 '13 at 14:47

Feb
18
comment Who discovered momentum?
@JohnMcVirgo Ok, fair enough. I was just going by what I learned in my Mechanics class but I thought that he did actually use F = ma in Principa Mathematica... guess I was wrong!
Feb
5
awarded  Editor
Feb
5
revised Could a Dyson sphere destroy a star?
added 37 characters in body
Feb
5
comment Could a Dyson sphere destroy a star?
Mm, ok. I see what you're saying. I always end up confusing myself when I think about problems like this!
Feb
5
comment Could a Dyson sphere destroy a star?
If you think about it, the shell's center of mass is directly in the middle. If that is even slightly misaligned with the CoM of the star, one side of the sphere will be attracted to the star more than the other and it will move towards that direction. As the side gets closer, it is attracted even more, causing it to crash into the star. It is explained on wikipedia better than I can: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyson_sphere#Dyson_shell
Feb
5
answered Could a Dyson sphere destroy a star?
Feb
5
awarded  Supporter
Jan
15
comment Who discovered momentum?
If anything, this guy contributed to formulate the idea of momentum more than Decartes: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Philoponus But I am not an expert or anything. The mathematical description of momentum, which we use in physics is a Newtonian thing but the philosophical idea has existed for millenia and Decartes contributed to that in some way. I don't really know enough to comment.
Jan
15
awarded  Teacher
Jan
15
answered Could a viable solar system work with a cluster of dwarf stars in center? And would it last longer than a single stellar mass star?
Jan
15
comment How long does it take to weigh an uncooperative mass?
If the center of mass isn't a problem then the measurement doesn't change in time. Unless your masses are jumping up and down? In which case this is more of a statistics problem than a physics one. You can never get an exact answer from a measurement but what you normally do is choose how much percentage error you are ok with and calculate the time required to get to that by assuming a particular statistical distribution, like say, a normal distribution. Sorry I couldn't be more help.
Jan
15
answered How long does it take to weigh an uncooperative mass?
Jan
15
answered Should you run when under rain?
Jan
15
answered Who discovered momentum?