100 reputation
9
bio website
location Wellington, New Zealand
age
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 12 hours ago

I am an undergraduate computer science and mathematics student in New Zealand. My fields of interest are computer graphics, in particular the physics of light transport, and to some extent cryptography, as well as programming and software development in general.


Jul
10
comment Why is it necessary for an object to have a bigger size than the wavelength of light in order for us to see it?
last link is dead
Feb
26
comment Why is the moment of inertia for a hollow sphere higher than a uniform sphere?
@user130632 Never mind.
Feb
26
comment Why is the moment of inertia for a hollow sphere higher than a uniform sphere?
This isn't rigorous, you haven't defined "low" and "high" and the scale of the gradient!
Nov
29
comment Would a sneeze by a cosmonaut in a spacesuit affect his movement?
So does that mean we can design sneeze-propelled engines?
Nov
28
comment Photons from stars--how do they fill in such large angular distances?
@JonofAllTrades I don't think gregsan was talking about that property of the laser, but just referring to any ordinary object that emits light into a cone rather than radiating outwards in every direction (a laser pointer comes to mind..) but the explanation would be valid even for a flashlight (barring atmospheric scattering effects, of course)
Nov
28
comment Photons from stars--how do they fill in such large angular distances?
A quick safety note: please do not stare into laser beams.
Aug
16
comment Information Preservation and Burning Books
@sundar From a theoretical point of view, if the laws of physics are reversible then your scenario cannot happen, since reversibility would imply that if two initial states $A$ and $B$ lead to the same state $C$, then $A$ and $B$ must be the same. Otherwise you couldn't really "reverse" that particular state, could you? Though on a practical level, yes, for us mere mortals, as we do not have the ability to reverse the laws of physics to see in the past, that information is as good as lost to us. This assumes the laws of physics are indeed reversible, of course.
Jul
15
comment How can you weigh your own head in an accurate way?
@MichaelBrown Ah I see, that is quite nice. I think I'll go with the suit though, otherwise I might not have enough mass for those satellites to get a stable orbit :p
Jul
14
comment How can you weigh your own head in an accurate way?
Won't the equipment and space suit skew the results?
Jul
14
comment How can you weigh your own head in an accurate way?
I think you broke his neck.. interesting approach though +1
Jul
14
comment How can you weigh your own head in an accurate way?
"The Compton scattering measurement is done by scanning your head with a gamma ray beam" sounds safe enough, you try first.
Jul
13
comment Where does the light go when I turn off the light switch?
Where does it go when you leave the light on? Surely it doesn't build up? That should answer your question :)
Jul
7
comment Is it necessary to consume energy to perform computation?
@ChrisWhite Agreed, that would make a killer title.
Jul
3
comment A water pipe from sea level to beyond the atmosphere
I like this explanation.
Mar
27
comment Eye sensitivity & Danger signal
Because if something is hot enough to glow white it's probably too late to run away :p (tongue in cheek)
Mar
5
awarded  Commentator
Mar
5
comment What is the optimal weight for a golf ball?
@Wouter Maybe air resistance and drag is important, too, though I'm not sure if this is negligible for golf balls.
Feb
20
awarded  Benefactor
Feb
20
accepted Can't seem to reconcile geometric optics and wave optics
Feb
18
comment Can't seem to reconcile geometric optics and wave optics
Thank you, it's a lot clearer now. I'll wait a bit and award the bounty to you in a few days if nothing else happens. Taking in this information will take time and I might have one or two more queries.